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Symposium Co-Chairs

Paul A Bunn Jr MD
Paul A. Bunn, Jr., MD
James Dudley Chair in Cancer Research
Professor, Medical Oncology
University of Colorado Denver
Executive Director, USA
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)
Aurora, CO

Roy S Herbst MD PhD
Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD
Ensign Professor of Medicine
Professor of Pharmacology
Chief of Medical Oncology
Director, Thoracic Oncology Research Program
Associate Director for Translational Research,
Translational Research Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale School of Medicine
New Haven, CT

Expert Faculty

Val R. Adams, PharmD, FCCP, BCOP
Val R. Adams, PharmD, FCCP, BCOP
Associate Professor
University of Kentucky
Lexington, KY

Tammy Allred, RN, OCN
Tammy Allred, RN, OCN
Thoracic Oncology and Sarcoma Nurse Navigator
UNC's Lineberger Cancer Center
Chapel Hill, NC

Marianne J. Davies, MSN, ACNP, APRN
Marianne J. Davies, MSN, ACNP, APRN
Oncology Nurse Practitioner
Smilow Cancer Center
New Haven, CT

Fred R. Hirsch, MD, PhD
Fred R. Hirsch, MD, PhD
Professor, Medicine and Pathology
University of Colorado
Denver, CO

Susan J. Keen, RN, OCN
Susan J. Keen, BSN, RN, OCN
Thoracic Nurse Navigator
Thomas Johns Cancer Hospital
CJW Medical Center
Richmond, VA

Karen Kelly, MD
Karen Kelly, MD
Professor of Medicine
Associate Director for Clinical Research
Jennifer Rene Harmon Tegley and Elizabeth Erica Harmon
Endowed Chair in Cancer Clinical Research
UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center
Sacramento, CA

Edward S. Kim, MD
Edward S. Kim, MD
Professor of Medicine,
Chair, Department of Solid Tumor Oncology
and Investigational Therapeutics
Levine Cancer Institute
Charlotte, NC

Philip C. Mack, MD, PhD
Philip C. Mack, MD, PhD
Assistant Adjunct Professor
Co-Leader Molecular Pharmacology
UC Davis Cancer Center
Sacramento, CA

Daniel Morgensztern, MD
Daniel Morgensztern, MD
Associate Professor, Medicine
Department of Internal Medicine
Medical Oncology
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, MO

Ronald Natale, MD
Ronald Natale, MD
Medical Director
Clinical Lung Cancer Program
Women's Guild Lung Institute
Cedars-Sinai
Los Angeles, CA

Alice T. Shaw, MD, PhD
Alice T. Shaw, MD, PhD
Attending Physician, Thoracic Oncology
Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center
Associate Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA

Heather Wakelee, MD
Heather Wakelee, MD
Assistant Professor
Department of Medicine
Division of Oncology
Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
Stanford Clinical Cancer Center
Stanford, CA

Jared Weiss, MD
Jared Weiss, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Division of Hematology and Oncology
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC

H. Jack West, MD
H. Jack West, MD
Medical Director, Thoracic Oncology Program
Swedish Cancer Institute
President and CEO
Global Resource for Advancing Cancer Education
Seattle, WA

CASE-BASED LEARNING

Manhattan Beach Marriott Hotel
(10 minutes from Los Angeles International airport)

Saturday, November 16, 2013

During this past year a very large amount of data regarding "practice-changing" novel strategies has been published revealing numerous new and improved best practices and personalized therapies for treating your lung cancer patients. Knowing these most-up-to-date techniques and data is essential. And you can earn up to 9 hours of CME/CE credit

This is the lung cancer symposium you should attend in 2013, especially if you are a community-based oncologist, oncology nurse, nurse practitioner, pharmacist or pathologist. It is by far, the single-most practical source of updated information on treating lung cancer patients, and, one of the only remaining live CME/CE events conducted on this malignancy. Now in its SIXTH consecutive year it utilizes a highly interactive clinical case-study format in a one-day meeting with a faculty of the top lung cancer experts to provide you with the most current information and data for use in your practice today.

Each of the presentations includes patient case studies where you make treatment selections based upon real-life scenarios, using the hand-held audience response system. And back by popular demand is the "Lunch with the Professors" where you can sit with the faculty expert of your choice. This Sixth Annual Symposium contains the summary of what you need to know for improving the outcomes of your patients. It includes highlights of the biannual International Symposium on Lung Cancer by the IASLC conducted in October 2013 in Sydney, Australia, only 2 weeks before this symposium. We urge you to review the agenda, faculty and other highlights regarding this symposium reviewed on this Website to fully understand and appreciate all of what this symposium has to offer you for only a very modest tuition.

At this symposium you will learn about new lung cancer treatment algorithms based upon the most up-to-date clinical strategies with new and existing targeted therapies, chemotherapy and molecular diagnostics. It also includes the key lung cancer clinical trials with drugs in late-stage development that are additional opportunities for helping your patients. This symposium will help you improve your selection of the most appropriate new therapeutic strategies, and will also help you to identify the patient sub-populations of lung cancer who will respond to personalized therapies.

New this year is the opportunity for symposium pre-registrants such as yourself to submit your own patient cases for discussion by the expert faculty during the symposium. A limited number of your cases will be reviewed during the four, 20-minute Panel Discussions on the agenda. Cases are accepted and reviewed on a first-come basis.

 

Educational Need Back to Top

Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in the US. In 2013 there will be an estimated 228,190 new cases and 159,480 deaths from lung cancer. Despite the large numbers of deaths occurring with this malignancy there is cause to be optimistic because of a large and increasing number of new lung cancer drugs, the molecular tests enabling patients to receive the drugs that will be most beneficial to them on a personalized therapy basis, and, novel treatment strategies that utilize all of these tools that have become public information since we conducted last year's "Fifth Annual Symposium on Personalized Therapies and Best Clinical Practices for Lung Cancer" in September 2012.

Lung cancer patient outcomes are continually improving. Patients are living longer and with a better quality of life because physicians and other healthcare professionals have access to the information to gain the knowledge and competence to treat, care for and manage their patients. Oncologists and other clinicians treating and caring for lung cancer patients have a better understanding of the cell biology of this malignancy, an increasing ability to personalize existing and emerging systemic lung cancer drug therapy because of newer and netter molecular and genomic tests, and expanded uses of many existing systemic lung cancer drug therapies, including novel strategies for maintenance therapy and strategies for better management of elderly and poor performance status patients.


Target Audience Back to Top

This activity is designed to meet the educational needs of and help close Practice Gaps of community-based medical oncologists, hematologists, radiation oncologists, surgical oncologists, pathologists, oncology pharmacists, oncology nurses, oncology nurse practitioners and other allied health-care professionals involved in the treatment, care and management of patients with lung cancer, including physician assistants and fellows. Lung cancer is treated optimally by a multi-disciplinary approach of clinicians and, thus, all of the aforementioned clinician specialties are targeted for invitation to this activity for personalized therapies of lung cancer.


Learning Objectives Back to Top
PHYSICIANS

Based on the data identified in the Needs Assessment and Physician Practice Gap Identification and Analysis, the following Learning Objectives have been developed for this CME activity:

  1. Utilize molecular biomarker testing and next-generation sequencing (NGS) for devising treatment strategies to personalize NSCLC patient therapies.
  2. Compare and contrast the clinical outcomes of first- and second-generation anti-EGFR strategies for NSCLC patients with mutation-positive and also wild type EGFR across all lines of therapy.
  3. Evaluate the patient outcomes using EML4-ALK targeting in treatment-naïve and relapsed NSCLC patients with first- and second-generation treatment strategies.
  4. Devise and apply clinical strategies utilizing ErbB family blockade for improving the outcomes of NSCLC patients who are candidates for this targeted therapeutic approach.
  5. Understand when and how to apply the various approaches for managing EGFR resistance in NSCLC patients using existing, novel and emerging strategies for targeting EGFR, c-MET, ErbB, EML4-ALK, MEK, Hsp90, VEGF, PI3K/Akt and other biologic pathways.
  6. Devise and apply clinical strategies utilizing multi-targeted antifolate, novel taxane and other user-friendly chemotherapeutics either as monotherapy or in combination with biologics for improving outcomes in elderly and performance status 2 NSCLC patients.
  7. Describe the NSCLC maintenance therapy standards of care and current options for improved patient outcomes applying multi-targeted antifolate, anti-angiogenesis and anti-EGFR strategies.
  8. Explain the various tools and strategies beyond the use of anti-cancer therapies for improving Quality of Life in advanced and metastatic NSCLC patients.
  9. Understand the opportunities and patients who are eligible for enrollment in clinical trials using late-stage investigational therapies directed against c-MET, IGF-1R, PARP, and other important biologic targets, including inhibitors of MEK by targeting KRAS.
  10. Develop strategies for improving NSCLC patient outcomes by targeting angiogenesis with existing and emerging, novel strategies using anti-VEGF and multi-targeted anti-angiogenic-based drugs such as triple angiokinase inhibitors.
  11. Compare and contrast immune-checkpoint inhibition for lung cancer with anti-PD-1, anti-PDL-1, and anti-CTLA-4 blockade with and without chemotherapy.
  12. Devise multidisciplinary treatment plans using the oncology nurse for managing patient care issues associated with the administration of immunomodulatory therapy for lung cancer, including the management of irAEs.
  13. Devise multidisciplinary treatment plans utilizing oncology pharmacists to help improve NSCLC patient outcomes by utilizing their expertise with dosing and dose adjustments, drug interactions, patient adherence, polypharmacy, formulary/pharmacoeconomics and other issues.
  14. Evaluate the various vaccine and other antigen-dependent immunotherapy strategies for improving lung cancer patient outcomes.
PHARMACISTS AND NURSES

Based on the data identified in the Needs Assessment and Practice Gap Identification and Analysis, the following Learning Objectives have been developed for this CE activity:

  1. Describe molecular biomarker testing and next-generation sequencing (NGS) for devising strategies to personalize NSCLC patient therapies.
  2. Outline the clinical outcomes of first- and second-generation anti-EGFR strategies for NSCLC patients with mutation-positive and also wild type EGFR across all lines of therapy.
  3. Recall the patient outcomes using EML4-ALK targeting in treatment-naïve and relapsed NSCLC patients with first- and second-generation treatment strategies.
  4. Identify the clinical strategies utilizing ErbB family blockade for improving the outcomes of NSCLC patients who are candidates for this targeted therapeutic approach.
  5. List the various approaches for managing EGFR resistance in NSCLC patients using existing, novel and emerging strategies for targeting EGFR, c-MET, ErbB, EML4-ALK, MEK, Hsp90, Hsp27, VEGF, PI3K/Akt and other biologic pathways.
  6. Define the clinical strategies utilizing multi-targeted antifolate, novel taxane and other user-friendly chemotherapeutics either as monotherapy or in combination with biologics for improving outcomes in elderly and performance status 2 NSCLC patients.
  7. Recall the NSCLC maintenance therapy standards of care and current options for improved patient outcomes applying multi-targeted antifolate, anti-angiogenesis and anti-EGFR strategies.
  8. List the various tools and strategies available beyond the use of anti-cancer therapies for improving Quality of Life in advanced and metastatic NSCLC patients.
  9. Identify opportunities and patients who are eligible for enrollment in clinical trials using late-stage investigational therapies directed against c-MET, IGF-1R, PARP, and other important biologic targets, including inhibitors of MEK by targeting KRAS.
  10. Define the various strategies for improving NSCLC patient outcomes by targeting angiogenesis with existing and emerging, novel strategies using anti-VEGF and multi-targeted anti-angiogenic-based drugs such as triple angiokinase inhibitors.
  11. Describe immune-checkpoint inhibition for lung cancer with anti-PD-1, anti-PDL-1, and anti-CTLA-4 blockade with and without chemotherapy.
  12. Explain the role of the oncology nurse for managing patient care issues associated with the administration of immunomodulatory therapy for lung cancer, including the management of irAEs.
  13. Identify how oncology pharmacists can help oncologists improve NSCLC patient outcomes by utilizing their expertise with dosing and dose adjustments, drug interactions, patient adherence, polypharmacy, formulary/pharmacoeconomics and other issues.
  14. List the various vaccine and other antigen-dependent immunotherapy strategies for improving lung cancer patient outcomes.

CME/CE Accreditation and Credit Designation Back to Top
The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Biomedical Learning Institute designates this live activity for a maximum of 9 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

UAN: 0838-0000-13-003-L01-P
Credits: 8.0 hours (0.8 ceu)
Type of Activity: Knowledge

The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

The Biomedical Learning Institute designates this educational activity for 8.0 contact hours.

To receive CE contact hour credit attendance at the entire activity and the successful completion of the post‐test and evaluation form is required.

Accreditation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation refers to recognition of educational activities and does not imply approval or endorsement of any product.

Physician Assistants: AAPA accepts certificates of attendance for educational activities certified for Category 1 credit from AOACCME, Prescribed credit from AAFP, and AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician Assistants may receive a maximum of 9 hours of Category 1 credit for attending this symposium.

Fellows will receive a certificate of attendance that they can submit to their accrediting organizations for continuing education credit.


Exhibit Information Back to Top

There is an opportunity to exhibit at this symposium. Please send an email to phillip.renner@bmli.com for more information or call 214-269-2007.

Educational Support

Sincere appreciation is extended to the following companies for their generous support of this independent educational activity:

Lilly
Celgene
Daiichi Sankyo
OncoGenex
Biodesix
Foundation Medicine
OncoplexDx
Exelixis
Qiagen