Symposium Co-Chairs

Paul A Bunn Jr MD
Paul A. Bunn, Jr., MD
Distinguished Professor
James Dudley Chair in Lung Cancer Research
Professor, Medical Oncology
University of Colorado Denver
Denver, CO

Roy S Herbst MD PhD
Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD
Ensign Professor of Medicine
Professor of Pharmacology
Chief of Medical Oncology
Director, Thoracic Oncology Research Program
Associate Director for Translational Research
Translational Research Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale School of Medicine
New Haven, CT

Medical Oncology Faculty

Scott N. Gettinger, MD
Scott N. Gettinger, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Thoracic Oncology Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale School of Medicine
New Haven, CT

Sarah B. Goldberg, MD, MPH
Sarah B. Goldberg, MD, MPH
Associate Professor of Medicine
Thoracic Oncology Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale School of Medicine
New Haven, CT

Philip C. Mack, PhD
Philip C. Mack, PhD
Assistant Adjunct Professor
Co-Leader Molecular Pharmacology
UC Davis Cancer Center
Sacramento, CA

Joel W. Neal, MD, PhD
Joel W. Neal, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Medicine
Division of Oncology
Stanford Cancer Institute
Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center
Stanford, CA

Gregory J. Riely, MD, PhD
Gregory J. Riely, MD, PhD
Medical Oncologist
Thoracic Oncology Service
Vice Chair,
Clinical Trials Office
Department of Medicine
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY

Mark A. Socinski, MD
Mark A. Socinski, MD
Professor of Medicine and Cardiothoracic Surgery
Director, Lung Cancer Section
Division of Hematology/Oncology
Clinical Associate Director, Lung SPORE Co-Director,
UPMC Lung Cancer Center of Excellence
Co-Director, Lung and Thoracic Malignancies Program
University of Pittsburgh UPMC
Pittsburgh, PA

Heather A. Wakelee, MD
Heather A. Wakelee, MD
Assistant Professor
Department of Medicine
Division of Oncology
Stanford Cancer Institute
Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center
Stanford, CA

H. Jack West, MD
H. Jack West, MD
Medical Director
Thoracic Oncology Program
Swedish Cancer Institute
President and CEO
Global Resource for Advancing Cancer Education (GRACE)
Seattle, WA

Oncology Nursing Faculty

Tammy Allred, RN, OCN
Tammy E. Allred, RN, OCN
Thoracic Nurse Navigator
University of North Carolina
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
Chapel Hill, NC

Marianne J. Davies, NP
Marianne J. Davies, NP
Clinical Instructor in Nursing
Thoracic Oncology Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale Schools of Nursing and Medicine
New Haven, CT

Oncology Pharmacist Faculty

Jim M. Koeller, MS
Jim M. Koeller, MS
Professor,
University of Texas at Austin
College of Pharmacy,
Pharmacotherapy Division
Adjoint Professor
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
School of Medicine, Pharmacotherapy Education & Research
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
San Antonio, TX

   
Educational Need
Target Audience
Learning Objectives
CME/CE Credit Information
Agenda
Faculty
Sofitel San Francisco Bay Hotel
Registration
Southwest Airlines
Exhibit Opportunities
   
Endorsed as an Educational Activity by
Resources

CASE-BASED LEARNING

Sofitel San Francisco Bay Hotel
(20 minutes from San Francisco International Airport)

Saturday, October 18, 2014

An opportunity to visit San Francisco at a very low price while attending a highly informative symposium.

This is a one-day CME/CE symposium on the treatment and management of patients with lung cancer. The focus is on community-based medical oncology practices, but all clinicians caring for lung cancer patients are invited, including academic and research-based oncologists and allied healthcare practitioners.

The primary objective is to provide a clinical update to oncologists, oncology nurses, nurse practitioners, oncology pharmacists and other healthcare professionals involved with the care of lung cancer patients.

Participants will enjoy a highly interactive educational program. Real-life patient cases are used throughout the day addressing the application of new clinical strategies with personalized medicine for lung cancer.

Using iPads provided at the symposium, participants will make patient management and treatment decisions involving clinical cases presented by the expert lung cancer faculty of 11 medical oncologists, an advanced nurse practitioner, a nurse navigator, a pharmacist, and a pathologist.

Participants will also use iPads to “answer yes or no” to rapid-fire questions on key topics addressing unmet medical needs; to vote on several lively debates addressing new and emerging clinical strategies; and, to take personal notes on the slides of the presentations. Each participant’s notes along with copies of all data presented throughout the day will be emailed to each participant immediately following the symposium.

During the past year a large amount of new information addressing the unmet medical needs of lung cancer patients has been published. This includes novel therapies and new and emerging standards of care. Strategies involving best clinical practices with personalized medicine are the focus of this symposium. And the timing of this program is designed to provide the participants with the most important clinical and scientific data of the year. This material is the most up-to-date possible on lung cancer, reflecting the information presented at the annual meeting of ASCO in June 2014, at AACR in May 2014 and at the forthcoming November 2014 Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology sponsored by IASLC, ASCO and AACR.

Now in its SEVENTH consecutive year, this symposium on Saturday October 18, 2014 provides a one-day update on the latest developments in the care and management of lung cancer patients. Up to 8.25 hours of CME/CE credit can be earned for participating.

 

Educational Need

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Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in the US. In 2014 according the American Cancer Society Facts and Figures there will be an estimated 224,210 new cases and 159,260 deaths from lung cancer. Despite the large numbers of deaths occurring with this malignancy there is cause to be optimistic because of a large and increasing number of new lung cancer drugs, tests enabling patients to receive the drugs that will be most beneficial to them on a personalized therapy basis, and, novel treatment strategies to use all of these tools that have become public information since we conducted last year’s "Sixth Annual Symposium on Personalized Therapies and Best Clinical Practices for Lung Cancer."

Despite the overall poor outcome, lung cancer patient outcomes are improving. Patients are living longer and with a better quality of life because physicians and other healthcare professionals have access to the information to gain the knowledge and competence to treat, care for and manage their patients. Physicians have a better understanding of lung cancer cell biology, an increasing ability to personalize existing and emerging systemic lung cancer drug therapy because of molecular and genomic diagnostic tests, the availability to use next-generation systemic lung cancer therapy and expanded uses of many existing systemic lung cancer drug therapies.


Target Audience

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This activity is designed to meet the educational needs of and help close Practice Gaps of medical oncologists, hematologists, radiation oncologists, surgical oncologists, pathologists, oncology pharmacists, oncology nurses, Nurse Practitioners and other allied healthcare professionals involved in the treatment, care and management of patients with lung cancer, including physician assistants and fellows. Lung cancer is treated optimally by a multi-disciplinary approach of clinicians and, thus, all of the aforementioned clinician specialties are targeted for invitation to this CME/CE activity for personalized therapies of lung cancer.


Learning Objectives

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Physicians

  1. Utilize non-genomic testing for identifying predictive molecular markers and driver mutations in NSCLC patients
  2. Compare and contrast testing strategies for molecular driver mutations in NSCLC patients with NextGen DNA testing
  3. Understand strategies for management of early-stage disease NSCLC patients with an identified actionable mutation
  4. Evaluate therapeutic strategies for EGFR mutation-positive patients in the first-line setting
  5. Evaluate therapeutic strategies for managing patients with an EGFR mutation who have relapsed or failed to respond to initial anti-EGFR therapy
  6. Review strategies for managing patients with ALK and other driver mutations besides EGFR
  7. Compare and contrast new and existing strategies for managing lung cancer patients with squamous cell and adenocarcinoma
  8. Compare and contrast various emerging immuno-oncology strategies for lung cancer patients
  9. Review systemic therapy options for special populations of lung cancer patients including elderly and poor performance status patients
  10. Devise multidisciplinary treatment plans utilizing oncology nurses and pharmacists to help clinical oncology teams improve lung cancer patient outcomes with immunotherapy

Nurses

  1. Describe non-genomic testing methods for identifying predictive molecular markers and driver mutations in NSCLC patients
  2. Recall testing strategies for molecular driver mutations in NSCLC patients using NextGen DNA testing
  3. Understand regimens of clinical trials for the management of early-stage NSCLC patients who have mutations such as EGFR
  4. List therapy regimens for EGFR mutation-positive patients in the first-line setting, including investigational therapies that are associated with new dosing and administration schedules and side effects
  5. List treatment regimens of clinical trials for patients with an EGFR mutation who have relapsed and be able to discuss information regarding investigational therapies
  6. Define treatment regimens of clinical trials for ALK mutation-positive lung cancer patients including investigational therapies that are associated with new dosing and administration schedules and side effects
  7. Describe new and existing treatment regimens for lung cancer patients with squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma
  8. Recall various emerging immuno-oncology therapy regimens for small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer
  9. Review dosing and administration schedules of therapy regimens for elderly and poor performance status NSCLC patients
  10. Describe treatment plans using immunotherapy for lung cancer to help oncology nurses educate patients and families about immunotherapy regimens

Pharmacists

  1. Describe non-genomic testing for identifying predictive molecular markers and driver mutations in NSCLC patients
  2. Recall testing strategies for molecular driver mutations in NSCLC patients with NextGen DNA testing
  3. Identify strategies for management of early-stage disease NSCLC patients with an identified actionable mutation
  4. List therapeutic strategies for EGFR mutation-positive patients in the first-line setting
  5. List therapeutic strategies for managing patients with an EGFR mutation who have relapsed or failed to respond to initial anti-EGFR therapy
  6. Define strategies for managing patients with ALK and other driver mutations besides EGFR
  7. Describe new and existing strategies for managing lung cancer patients with squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma
  8. Recall various emerging immuno-oncology strategies for lung cancer patients
  9. Identify systemic therapy options for special populations of lung cancer patients including elderly and poor performance status patients
  10. Describe multidisciplinary treatment plans utilizing oncology pharmacists to help educate other members of the oncology team regarding lung cancer immunotherapy

CME/CE Accreditation and Credit Designation

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Physicians

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The BioMedical Learning Institute designates this live activity for a maximum of 8.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Pharmacists

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

UAN: 0838-0000-14-002-L01-P
Credits: 8.25 hours (0.825 ceu)
Type of Activity: Knowledge

To receive CE contact hour credit, attendance at the entire activity and the successful completion of the post‐test and evaluation form is required.

Nurses

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

The BioMedical Learning Institute designates this educational activity for 8.25 contact hours.

Accreditation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation refers to recognition of educational activities and does not imply approval or endorsement of any product.

To receive CE contact hour credit, attendance at the entire activity and the successful completion of the post‐test and evaluation form is required.

Other

Physician Assistants: AAPA accepts certificates of attendance for educational activities certified for Category 1 credit from AOACCME, Prescribed credit from AAFP, and AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician Assistants may receive a maximum of 8.25 hours of Category 1 credit for attending this symposium.

Fellows will receive a certificate of attendance that they can submit to their accrediting organizations for continuing education credit.


Exhibit Information

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There is an opportunity to exhibit at this symposium. Please send an email to exhibits@bmli.com for more information or call 214-269-2007.

Educational Support

Sincere appreciation is extended to companies providing support for this independent educational activity.

Lilly
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Celgene
Merck
Astellas
Clovis Oncology
OBR
Novartis
AstraZeneca
OncoPlex Diagnostics
Myriad Genetic Laboratories
(Others pending)