Cancer Education
focusing on Specialized Topics of Interest

Taught by the Experts

Symposium Co-Chairs

Paul A. Bunn, Jr., MD
Paul A. Bunn, Jr., MD
(Co-Chair & Course Director)
Distinguished Professor
James Dudley Chair in Lung Cancer Research
Professor, Medical Oncology
University of Colorado, Denver
Founder and Past Executive Director of the IASLC
(International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer)
Denver, CO
Leo I. Gordon, MD
Leo I. Gordon, MD
(Co-Chair)
Abby and John Friend Professor of Cancer Research
Professor in Medicine
Director Lymphoma Program
Co-Director Hematologic Malignancies Program
Division of Hematology/Oncology
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University
Medical Director of the John and Lillian Matthews Center for Cellular Therapy
Chicago, IL

Medical Oncology Faculty

Thomas A. Abrams, MD
Thomas A. Abrams, MD
Senior Physician
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Department of Gastrointestinal Malignancies
Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA
Ranjana Advani, MD
Ranjana Advani, MD
Saul A. Rosenberg Professor of Lymphoma
Professor of Medicine
Stanford Cancer Institute
Stanford, CA
Dara Aisner, MD, PhD
Dara Aisner, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Pathology
Co-Director of the Colorado Molecular Correlates Laboratory
University of Colorado School of Medicine
University of Colorado Cancer Center
Denver, CO
Philippe Armand, MD, PhD
Philippe Armand, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Staff, Medical Oncology
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA
Tanya Dorff, MD
Tanya Dorff, MD
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine
Keck School of Medicine of USC
Los Angeles, CA
Edward Garon, MD
Edward Garon, MD
Professor of Medicine and
Director, Department of Thoracic Oncology
UCLA Jonsson Cancer center
Los Angeles, CA
Jared Weiss, MD
Richard J. Gralla, MD, FACP
Professor of Medicine
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Jacobi Medical Center
Bronx, NY
Timothy F. Greten, MD
Timothy F. Greten, MD
Head, Gastrointestinal Malignancy Section
Senior Investigator
Thoracic and Gastrointestinal Branch
National Cancer Institute
Bethesda, MD
Roy S Herbst MD PhD
Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD
Ensign Professor of Medicine
Professor of Pharmacology
Chief of Medical Oncology
Director, Thoracic Oncology Research Program
Associate Director for Translational Research
Translational Research Program, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale School of Medicine
New Haven, CT
Elias Jabbour, MD
Elias Jabbour, MD
Associate Professor
Leukemia Department
MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, TX
Geoffrey Y. Ku, MD
Geoffrey Y. Ku, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Attending Physician
Weill Cornell Medical School
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY
Corey J. Langer, MD
Corey J. Langer, MD
Professor of Medicine
Director of Thoracic Oncology
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA
S. Vincent Rajkumar, MD
S. Vincent Rajkumar, MD
Professor of Medicine
Chair, Mayo Clinic Myeloma Amyloidosis Dysproteinemia Group
Associate Editor, Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Section Editor, Leukemia
The Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN
Chair, ECOG Myeloma Committee
Stanley R. Riddell, MD
Stanley R. Riddell, MD
Professor, School of Medicine
University of Washington
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Seattle, WA
Susan Slovin, MD, PhD
Susan Slovin, MD, PhD
Attending Physician, Member
Genitourinary Oncology Service
Sidney Kimmel Center for Prostate and Urologic Cancers
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Professor of Medicine
Weill Cornell Medical College
New York, NY
David Spigel, MD
David Spigel, MD
Director, Lung Cancer Research Program
Sarah Cannon Research Institute
Tennessee Oncology
Nashville, TN
Jeffrey S. Weber, MD., PhD
Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD
Director, Donald A. Adam
Comprehensive Melanoma Research Center
Senior Member, Moffitt Cancer Center
Professor and Associate Chair,
Department of Oncologic Sciences
University of South Florida
Tampa, FL
H. Jack West, MD
H. Jack West, MD
Medical Director, Thoracic Oncology Program
Swedish Cancer Institute
President and CEO
Global Resource for Advancing Cancer Education
Seattle, WA

Oncology Nursing Faculty

Marianne J. Davies, DNP, MSN, RN, APRN, CNS-BC, ACNP-BC, AOCNP
Marianne J. Davies, DNP, MSN, RN, APRN, CNS-BC, ACNP-BC, AOCNP
Clinical Instructor in Nursing
Thoracic Oncology Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale Schools of Nursing and Medicine
New Haven, CT

Oncology Pharmacist Faculty

Jim M. Koeller, MS
Jim M. Koeller, MS
Professor,
University of Texas at Austin
College of Pharmacy,
Pharmacotherapy Division
Adjoint Professor
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
School of Medicine, Pharmacotherapy Education & Research
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
San Antonio, TX
  1. Only limited seating is available
  2. An opportunity to visit San Francisco at a very low price of $162 a night
    while attending a highly informative symposium.
  3. Contact us for remaining group discounts
A Multi-Disciplinary CME/CE Cancer Symposium in San Francisco, CA

For oncologists, hematologists, fellows, nurse practitioners, nurses, pharmacists, & other Healthcare Professionals

6:30AM Registration and Buffet Breakfast
7:30AM Welcome, Introductions and CME/CE Pre Test
Dr. Bunn
SESSION #1: LUNG CANCER and HEAD & NECK CANCER: The Rapidly-Changing Paradigms Using Immune Therapies, Targeted Therapies, and Chemotherapies (beginning with several “Rapid-Fire” Questions asked of the audience by. Dr. Bunn)
Chair: Dr. Bunn
7:40AM NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER (NSCLC): What are the standards of care using checkpoint inhibition for treatment-naïve advanced or metastatic patients?
  • Should we ever temporarily stop immune therapy, and if so, for how long for patients responding to immune therapy?
  • And if immune therapy is resumed, when do we restart? And Is the next therapy the same or a different checkpoint inhibitor?
Dr. Garon
7:55AM NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER (NSCLC): What are the optimal salvage therapies for advanced or metastatic NSCLC patients (of all histologies) who have progressed after any systemic therapy, either monotherapy or any combinations?
  • Should we ever temporarily stop immune therapy, and if so, for how long for patients responding to immune therapy?
  • And if immune therapy is resumed, when do we restart? And Is the next therapy the same or a different checkpoint inhibitor?
Dr. Spigel
8:10AM NSCLC Mini-Questions:
  • Is there an optimal, initial therapy for treatment-naïve NSCLC patients with high PD-L1 expression levels as the standard of care?
  • Is there an optimal systemic therapeutic regimen to use as therapy for treatment-naïve NSCLC patients with low or no PD-L1 expression levels?
Dr. Garon
8:20AM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert NSCLC faculty answers the “queued-up” audience questions submitted via their iPads, other “smart devices” or floor mikes, & engages in a lively discussion
Dr. Bunn (Moderator)
8:35AM NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER (NSCLC): What are the newest standards of care for managing EGFR- and ALK-positive advanced or metastatic NSCLC patients in the 1st line setting and for patient after disease progression?
  • How does a clinician decide among the numerous new agents for managing AR for patients with the EGFR mutation or the ALK-re-arrangement?
  • What are the standards of care with targeted therapy vs. immune therapy vs. chemotherapy?
  • What is the clinical role for NGS testing in NSCLC patients with driver mutations?
Dr. West
8:50AM NSCLC Mini-Questions:
  • Should all treatment-naïve advanced or metastatic NSCLC patients be tested for driver mutations such as ROS, BRAF, RET, MET, HER-2, KRAS, CDK4/CDK6?
  • And if they are positive for any of these mutations how should they be treated?
Dr. Bunn
9:00AM BREAK
9:15AM HEAD & NECK CANCER: What the current standards of care and the emerging strategies for advanced or metastatic H&N squamous cell carcinoma using:
  • Checkpoint inhibition
  • Anti-EGFR strategies
  • Investigational agents in clinical trials
Dr. Langer
9:30AM Audience Q & A: Dr. Langer answers the “queued-up” audience questions submitted via their iPads, iPhones, Laptops, other “smart devices,” or by floor microphones
Dr. Langer & AUDIENCE
9:35AM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert thoracic faculty answers the remaining “queued-up” audience questions submitted via their “smart devices” or floor mikes, & engages in a lively discussion
Dr. Bunn, Thoracic Faculty & AUDIENCE
SESSION #2: GASTRO-INTESTINAL MALIGNANCIES: The Rapidly-Changing Paradigms Using Immune Therapies, Targeted Therapies, Chemotherapies and Molecular Testing (beginning with several “Rapid-Fire” Questions asked of the audience by. Dr. Greten)
Chair: Dr. Greten
9:50AM HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA: Integrating the new and emerging immune & targeted therapies into current standards of care.
Dr. Greten
10:05AM Audience Q & A: Dr. Greten answers the “queued-up” audience questions submitted via their iPads, iPhones, Laptops, other “smart devices,” or by floor microphones
Dr. Greten & AUDIENCE
10:10AM PANCREATIC CANCER: Integrating the advances with translational biology strategies using novel immune and targeted therapies.
Dr. Abrams
10:25AM Audience Q & A: Dr. Abrams answers the “queued-up” audience questions submitted via their iPads, iPhones, Laptops, other “smart devices,” or by floor microphones
Dr. Abrams & AUDIENCE
10:30AM GASTRIC & ESOPHAGEAL CANCERS: Integrating the new and emerging immune & targeted therapies into current standards of care.
Dr. Ku
10:45AM Audience Q & A: Dr. Ku answers the “queued-up” audience questions submitted via their iPads, iPhones, Laptops, other “smart devices,” or by floor microphones
Dr. Ku & AUDIENCE
10:50AM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert G-I faculty answers the remaining “queued-up” audience questions submitted via their “smart devices” or floor mikes, & engages in a lively discussion
Dr. Greten, G-I Faculty & AUDIENCE
SESSION #3: GENITO-URINARY MALIGNANCIES: The Rapidly-Changing Paradigms Using Immune Therapies, Targeted Therapies, and Chemotherapies (beginning with several “Rapid-Fire” Questions asked of the audience by. Dr. Slovin)
Chair: Dr. Slovin
11:00AM UROTHELIAL & OTHER BLADDER CANCERS: Integrating the new and emerging immune & targeted therapies into current standards of care.
Dr. Dorf
11:15AM Audience Q & A: Dr. Dorf answers the “queued-up” audience questions submitted via their iPads, iPhones, Laptops, other “smart devices,” or by floor microphones
Dr. Dorf & AUDIENCE
11:20AM RENAL CELL CANCER: Integrating the new and emerging immune & targeted therapies into current standards of care.
Dr. TBD
11:35AM Audience Q & A: Dr. TBD answers the “queued-up” audience questions submitted via their iPads, iPhones, Laptops, other “smart devices,” or by floor microphones
Dr. TBD & AUDIENCE
11:40AM PROSTATE CANCER: Integrating the new and emerging immune & targeted therapies and chemotherapies into current standards of care.
Dr. Slovin
11:55AM Audience Q & A: Dr. Slovin answers the “queued-up” audience questions submitted via their iPads, iPhones, Laptops, other “smart devices,” or by floor microphones
Dr. Slovin & AUDIENCE
12:00PM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert G-U faculty answers the remaining “queued-up” audience questions submitted via their “smart devices” or floor mikes, & engages in a lively discussion
Dr. Slovin, G-U Faculty & AUDIENCE
12:15PM LUNCH WITH THE PROFESSORS -- 3 options: (all include CME/CE credit) most importantly
  • All faculty & disciplines as desired for Lunch with the Physicians
  • Quality Improvement (Dr. Gralla)
  • Pharmacy Lunch with Jim Koeller: "Determining Optimal Value Established for Immunotherapies?"
  • Nursing Lunch with Marianne Davies: “Topic TBD” (Dr. Davies)
Drs. Gralla, Koeller, & Davies
SESSION #4: HEMATOLOGIC MALIGNANCIES MALIGNANCIES: The Rapidly-Changing Paradigms Using Immune Therapies, Targeted Therapies, and Chemotherapies (beginning with several “Rapid-Fire” Questions asked of the audience by. Dr. Leo Gordon)
Chair: Dr. Gordon
1:15PM HODGKIN LYMPHOMA: The emerging role of immune therapy
  • What is the standard of care for refractory CD-30 Hodgkin Lymphoma? What are Other options? What is the role of immune checkpoint inhibition? What about combinations with brentuximab Vedotin?
  • What are the novel therapies on the near-term horizon for refractory cHL? Do these include CD19CAR-t cells?
Dr. Advani
1:30PM NON-HODGKIN LYMPHOMA: What are the roles for Immunotherapy, targeted therapy and chemotherapy for Refractory & Initial Recurrence of DLBCL, Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma/Indolent Lymphoma
  • Is Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation still the standard of care?
  • Checkpoint inhibition versus CAR-t cells
Dr. Armand
1:45PM Expert Panel and Audience Q & A on N-H-Lymphoma: Drs. Armand & Gordon answer the “queued-up” questions submitted by the audience via their iPads, etc.
Drs. Armand, Advani, & Gordon
2:00PM MULTIPLE MYELOMA: Expanding the Therapeutic Options by Targeting SLAMF7, CD38, Checkpoint Inhibition and Other Targets with Immune or Targeted Therapy various combinations.
  • Immunotherapy vs. targeted therapy vs. IMiDs vs. CAR-t cells versus BiTE MAbs
  • Current and emerging targets, including CD38, SLAMF7, PD-1/ PD-L1, CD-19
Dr. Rajkumar
2:20PM Audience Q & A: Dr. Rajkumar answers the “queued-up” questions submitted by the audience either via their “smart devices,” or asked from the floor microphones
Dr. Rajkumar & AUDIENCE
2:30PM ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA (AML): Advances with Targeted and Immunotherapy strategies following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, and used as initial and salvage therapy
  • Newly-diagnosed AML patients with the FLT3 mutation
  • Salvage monotherapy for AML patients with the FLT3 mutation
  • Salvage therapy for AML patients with the (IDH2 mutation)
  • Other Investigational targets and therapies
Dr. Jabbour
2:45PM ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA (ALL) and ACUTE LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA (ALL): Advances in the Treatment of ALL with Immunotherapies and Targeted Therapies
  • Targeted therapies vs. Immunotherapy including IMiDs vs. CAR T-cells and BiTE MAbs
  • Current and emerging targets, including CD3, CD19, CD22, CD20, etc.
Dr. Riddell
3:00PM CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA (CLL): Advances in the Treatment of CLL with Novel Targeted Therapies: Intracellular Targets and Cell Surface targets.
  • Novel antibodies with and without toxins versus various novel immunotherapies and established immune therapies such as IMiDs and versus chemotherapy
  • Current and emerging targets, including BCL2, patients with the 17p deletion
Dr. TBD
3:15PM BREAK
3:30PM Expert Panel and Audience Q & A on Leukemias and addressing the “queued-up” questions submitted by the audience via their iPads, iPhones, etc., their other “smart devices,” or from floor microphones
  • Novel antibodies with and without toxins versus various novel immunotherapies and established immune therapies such as IMiDs and versus chemotherapy
  • Current and emerging targets, including BCL2, patients with the 17p deletion
HEMATOLOGY FACULTY & AUDIENCE
SESSION #5: MALIGNANT MELANOMA: The Ever-Changing Paradigms Using Immune Therapies, Targeted Therapies, and Chemotherapies (beginning with several “Rapid-Fire” Questions asked of the audience by. Dr. Jeffrey Weber)
Chair: Dr. Weber
4:00PM DEBATE: Should Immuno-Oncology Therapy or Targeted Therapy be Used as a Front-line Regimen for Treatment-Naïve BRAF-mutated metastatic melanoma?
  • Immuno-therapy for treatment-naïve BRAF-mutated melanoma (Dr. Weber)
  • Targeted therapy for treatment-naïve BRAF-mutated melanoma (Dr. TBD)
Drs. Weber vs. TBD
4:15PM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q&A
Dr. Weber & AUDIENCE
4:30PM Malignant Melanoma Mini-Topics:
  • •For which patients is dual Immuno-therapy (anti-CTLA-4 + anti-PD-1/PD-L1 or anti-PD-1/PD-L1) for BRAF-mutated malignant melanoma optimal?
  • When should the combination of immune therapy + targeted therapy be used for treatment-naïve BRAF melanoma
Dr. Weber
4:55PM Expert Panel and Audience Q & A on melanoma and addressing the “queued-up” questions submitted by the audience via their iPads, iPhones, etc., their other “smart devices,” or from floor microphones
Dr. Weber & AUDIENCE
4:55PM Closing Remarks and CME/CE Post Test
Dr. Weber
5:00PM Adjourn

CASE-BASED LEARNING

San Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront

Saturday, November 11, 2017

 

Overview

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The overall objective of this annual, one-day live symposium is to review the ongoing integration of many novel immune therapies and novel targeted therapies into the evolving standards of care, including the use of chemotherapy, for many malignancies. Standards of are care are evolving due to a continuing stream of FDA drug approvals, the evolving NCCN and ASCO guidelines and the increasing number of ongoing investigational clinical trials available to patients now.

What makes this symposium unique and highly relevant and practical to oncologists, hematologists, nurses, pharmacists, scientists and other cancer HealthCare Professionals (HCPs) is that it concurrently addresses integrating all of these new immune and targeted therapies into routine practice. This is the “real world” situation of how oncologists and hematologists and other HCPs must learn how to optimally incorporate all of these new therapies into their practices. Other oncology/hematology educational symposia either deal with immune therapy or targeted therapy, one or the other, which we believe is not the optimal way to introduce how to use these new therapies into routine practice. They must be evaluated concurrently for many reasons cited below.

For a large number of malignancies, e.g., lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, leukemia and melanoma, there are both new and emerging targeted therapies, as well as new and emerging immune therapies. For many patients these new therapies have similar, if not identical indications. Strategies employing these new immune and targeted therapies include single-agent usage, as well as combinations of immune therapy plus targeted therapy, and dual combinations of either class of therapy, and also, the optimal sequencing of these new therapies, especially with the use of established chemotherapy and chemotherapy backbones, for a large number of solid and hematologic malignancies. Treating most malignancies today involves the evaluation of numerous options of different therapies—more than ever before. This can only be adequately addressed with a symposium that reviews new immune and new targeted therapies at the same time.

Melanoma is a good example malignancy where oncologists are facing dilemmas regarding how to use targeted and immune therapies today: using monotherapy, or dual and sometimes even triple immune or targeted combination therapy. And of course, depending upon the lines of therapy, when to use and switch specific strategies in order to optimize sequencing of therapy is also a critical issue to be understood.

Several other malignancies also illustrate the educational needs for this symposium. Besides melanoma, a few questions-in-practice and dilemmas for NSCLC, pancreatic cancer and several hematologic malignancies are relevant examples and include: 1) How do clinicians select among the many new, FDA-approved checkpoint inhibitor-based strategies and their many permutations/combinations for improving outcome with NSCLC patients, plus the soon to be FDA-approved additional immune therapies? Similarly, 2) How do clinicians match NSCLC patients with specific EGFR mutations and the three generations of EGFR-directed TKI therapies, plus sequencing all of these 1st 2nd and 3rd generation EGFR-based strategies as monotherapy versus combination therapy for managing EGFR acquired resistance? 3) How do clinicians decide which is the appropriate strategy for 2nd-line non-EGFR mutated NSCLC: Is it a VEGFR-directed targeted therapy strategy or is it an immune-based (checkpoint inhibition) strategy or a taxane monotherapy? or a combination of classes? 4) How do clinicians decide which is better for improving patient outcome: either enrollment in a clinical trial to receive a new immune or targeted strategy, such as an investigational checkpoint inhibitor, or an anti-CDK/4, anti-CDK/6 or other late-stage investigational targeted therapy versus an established taxane chemotherapy approach? 5) How do hematologists begin selecting from the newest immune therapies for several lymphomas versus radiation and stem cell transplants, etc.? 6) How do oncologists integrate the most recent immune and targeted therapy data using novel JAK and BTK inhibition versus CAR T-Cell, stem cells, vaccines and other immune therapies for pancreatic cancer? These dilemmas and critical questions will be addressed at the symposium in order to optimize the potential benefits from the various and increasing new and emerging therapies that are being integrated into new standards of cancer care.

The increasing use of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) testing for NSCLC and other malignancies has made the identification of many more biologic targets and pathways as targets that can possibly improve patient outcome. The ability of NGS to identify these new biologic targets such as BRAF, MET, MEK, ROS 1, HER2, etc., for NSCLC, breast cancer and other solid malignancies has expanded the potential list of targeted therapy options for community-based practitioners as well as has increased the options for using the new immune therapies and their combinations with both targeted therapies and in some cases, novel chemotherapies, which are under active clinical investigation. This has expanded the use of NGS testing, used as large gene panels, and also as liquid and even urine based-biopsy ctDNA testing, versus tissue-based testing and FDA-approved companion diagnostic molecular tests.

The standards of cancer care for most malignancies for the forthcoming several years will continue to be evolving with a very large number of options as existing treatment algorithms integrate new immune and new targeted therapies into the traditional systemic anticancer therapies, including chemotherapy and radiation and surgery. This symposium will emphasize and facilitate an in-depth understanding of how the new immune and novel targeted therapies are best integrated into standards of care for improving cancer patient outcome. No other educational symposium or Webinar deals with the ”real world” integration of immune and targeted therapy as does this symposium.

CME & CE CREDIT

This symposium provides 8.75 hours of CME credit to physicians, 8.75 hours of CNE credit to nurses, 8 hours of CPE credit to pharmacists, and a Certificate of Attendance for fellows and other HCPs for receiving 8.75 hours of credit from their professional organizations and accrediting societies.

To receive CME/CE credit, the learners attending the symposium have up to one week following the symposium to complete the required symposium survey (on line), and to successfully answer the knowledge test questions found on BioMedical Learning Institute (BMLI) Website. All of the PowerPoint® slides, recorded audio and PowerPoint presentations will be available for download and "24/7" access approximately 6 to 8 weeks following the symposium.

Bring your own “Smart Devices” to interact with the faculty

Please bring your iPhones, iPads, tablets, Androids, Laptop Computers, etc., to the symposium. If you forget, we will have extras for you to use in San Francisco. This will enable you and the other symposium participants to use your personal “smart devices” during the symposium to ask any questions of the faculty throughout the symposium from your seats in the audience, and also, to enable you and others in the audience to answer the numerous clinical care treatment questions of each faculty member during their presentations.


Educational Need

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The educational need for this activity is the result of recent and continuing FDA approvals of new immune therapies and new targeted therapies for a large number of solid and hematologic malignancies. And because for many malignancies these new therapies have similar if not the same indications and usage, it is essential that their new applications within the current standards of care be evaluated concurrently in one symposium. With an understanding of the most current clinical trials’ data and FDA indications involving immune and targeted therapies, it will be possible for HCPs to deliver optimal patient care for many malignancies, resulting in improved outcome.


Target Audience

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This activity is designed to meet the educational needs of medical oncologists, hematologists, radiation oncologists, surgical oncologists, pathologists, oncology pharmacists, oncology nurses/Advanced Nurse Practitioners, and other allied healthcare professionals involved in the treatment, care and management of patients with solid and hematologic malignancies that are responsive to immune and targeted therapies. Cancer Is treated optimally by a multi-disciplinary approach of clinicians, and thus, all of the aforementioned clinical specialties are targeted for invitation to this CME/CE activity.


Learning Objectives

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Physicians

  1. Understand the differences in efficacy and toxicity between immunotherapies, new-generation targeted therapies, and traditional targeted therapy and chemotherapy.
  2. Compare and contrast the various emerging and current therapies for pancreatic cancer.
  3. Compare and contrast the targeted and emerging immune therapies for leukemia.
  4. Analyze the different strategies for non-small cell lung cancer involving immune therapy versus targeted therapy and regimens with chemotherapy backbones.
  5. Devise various treatment strategies using immunotherapy and targeted therapy utilizing monotherapy, combinations and sequencing of therapies for melanoma.
  6. Analyze the various investigational strategies for HER2 and non-HER2 gastric and esophageal cancers.
  7. Describe the emerging targeted and immune therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma.
  8. Assess the new and emerging data utilizing immune therapy and targeted therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma.
  9. Compare and contrast the use of the immune therapy and targeted therapy for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, and Follicular Lymphoma.
  10. Describe the various new and emerging strategies for treating the following leukemia with systemic therapy: AML, ALL and CLL.
  11. Evaluate the different therapeutic strategies for Multiple Myeloma, including new-generation targeted therapy, immunotherapy with checkpoint inhibition and with IMiDs, in both combination and monotherapy regimens.
  12. Integrate the new checkpoint inhibitor immune therapies and the established and emerging targeted strategies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
  13. Describe the various immune and targeted therapy strategies for metastatic urothelial carcinoma and metastatic bladder cancers.
  14. Compare and contrast the different immunotherapy and targeted therapy strategies for metastatic and relapsed squamous cell Head & Neck cancer.

Nurses

  1. Review the differences in efficacy and toxicity between immunotherapies, new-generation targeted therapies, and traditional targeted therapy and chemotherapy.
  2. List the various emerging and current therapies for pancreatic cancer.
  3. Recognize the differences between the targeted and emerging immune therapies for leukemia.
  4. Recognize the different strategies for non-small cell lung cancer involving immune therapy versus targeted therapy and regimens with chemotherapy backbones.
  5. Identify various treatment strategies using immunotherapy and targeted therapy utilizing monotherapy, combinations and sequencing of therapies for melanoma.
  6. Review the various investigational strategies for HER2 and non-HER2 gastric and esophageal cancers.
  7. List the emerging targeted and immune therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma.
  8. Recall the new and emerging data utilizing immune therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma.
  9. Outline the use of the immune therapy and targeted therapy for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, and Follicular Lymphoma.
  10. Review the various new and emerging strategies for treating the following leukemia with systemic therapy: AML, ALL and CLL.
  11. Define the different therapeutic strategies for Multiple Myeloma, including new-generation targeted therapy, immunotherapy with checkpoint inhibition and with IMiDs, in both combination and monotherapy regimens.
  12. Integrate the new checkpoint inhibitor immune therapies and the established and emerging targeted and immune strategies for renal cell carcinoma.
  13. Describe the various immune and targeted therapy strategies for metastatic urothelial carcinoma and metastatic bladder cancers.
  14. List the different immunotherapy and targeted therapy strategies for metastatic and relapsed squamous cell Head & Neck cancer.

Pharmacists

  1. Review the differences in efficacy and toxicity between immunotherapies, new-generation targeted therapies, and traditional targeted therapy and chemotherapy.
  2. List the various emerging and current therapies for pancreatic cancer.
  3. Recognize the differences between the targeted and emerging immune therapies for leukemia.
  4. Recognize the different strategies for non-small cell lung cancer involving immune therapy versus targeted therapy and regimens with chemotherapy backbones.
  5. Identify various treatment strategies using immunotherapy and targeted therapy utilizing monotherapy, combinations and sequencing of therapies for melanoma.
  6. Review the various investigational strategies for HER2 and non-HER2 gastric and esophageal cancers.
  7. List the emerging targeted and immune therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma.
  8. Recall the new and emerging data utilizing immune therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma.
  9. Outline the use of the immune therapy and targeted therapy for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, and Follicular Lymphoma.
  10. Review the various new and emerging strategies for treating the following leukemia with systemic therapy: AML, ALL and CLL.
  11. Define the different therapeutic strategies for Multiple Myeloma, including new-generation targeted therapy, immunotherapy with checkpoint inhibition and with IMiDs, in both combination and monotherapy regimens.
  12. Integrate the new checkpoint inhibitor immune therapies and the established and emerging targeted and immune strategies for renal cell carcinoma.
  13. Describe the various immune and targeted therapy strategies for metastatic urothelial carcinoma and metastatic bladder cancers.
  14. List the different immunotherapy and targeted therapy strategies for metastatic and relapsed squamous cell Head & Neck cancer.

CME/CE Accreditation and Credit Designation

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Physicians

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The BioMedical Learning Institute designates this live activity for a maximum of 8.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Pharmacists

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

UAN: 0838-0000-17-004-L01-P
Credits: 8.75 hours (0.875 ceu)
Type of Activity: Knowledge

To receive CE contact hour credit, attendance at the entire activity and the successful completion of the post‐test and evaluation form is required.

Nurses

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

The BioMedical Learning Institute designates this educational activity for 8.75 contact hours.

Accreditation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation refers to recognition of educational activities and does not imply approval or endorsement of any product.

To receive CE contact hour credit, attendance at the entire activity and the successful completion of the post‐test and evaluation form is required.

Other

Physician Assistants: AAPA accepts certificates of attendance for educational activities certified for Category 1 credit from AOACCME, Prescribed credit from AAFP, and AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician Assistants may receive a maximum of 8.75 hours of Category 1 credit for attending this symposium.

Fellows will receive a certificate of attendance that they can submit to their accrediting organizations for continuing education credit.


Location of this Symposium

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San Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront
1800 Old Bayshore Highway
Burlingame, California 94010
(650) 692-9100

The discounted room rates of $162 will expire on October 20, 2017. Please note that there are two ways to reserve a room for this symposium.

Click here to reserve your hotel sleeping room online


Exhibit Information

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There is an opportunity to exhibit at this symposium. Please send an email to exhibits@bmli.com for more information or call 214-269-2014

EXHIBIT FEES:

  • The fee for a 6-foot tabletop display is $1,999.

TERMS FOR EXHIBITORS:

  • Exhibitors who are not registered attendees to the symposium will not have access to the buffet breakfast or the buffet Lunch with the Professors.
  • The Exhibitors will not have access to the scientific sessions unless they are registered for the activity.

Educational Support

Sincere appreciation is extended to companies providing support for this independent educational activity.

Bayer
Lilly
Novartis
MEI Pharma
Pfizer
More company support pending
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Educational Partner