The New Frontier in NSCLC Beyond EGFR, VEGF, and ALK
Expanding the Paradigm to Include Patients Without Actionable Mutations
Overview
  • Dates of Release & Expiration: October 25, 2015 - October 25, 2016
  • Available "24/7" on-demand, to be viewed either as a CME or CE or non-accredited program
  • 3 expert medical oncologists
  • 1 Category 1 CME credit available for physicians
  • 1 CE credit available for nurses and pharmacists
Co-Chairs
Mark A. Socinski, MD
Professor of Medicine and Thoracic Surgery
Director, Lung Cancer Section
Division of Hematology/Oncology
Co-Director, UPMC Lung Cancer center of Excellence
Co-Director, Lung and Thoracic Malignancies Program
University of Pittsburgh
UPMC Cancer Pavilion
Pittsburgh, PA

Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD
Ensign Professor of Medicine
Professor of Pharmacology
Chief of Medical Oncology
Director, Thoracic Oncology Research Program
Associate Director for Translational Research
Translational Research Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale School of Medicine
New Haven, CT

 
Click here to
view this 1-hour webinar and earn either CME or CE credit. Requires completion of a brief evaluation form, participation in 4 pre- and post-questions, and successfully passing a CME or CE test of 4 questions
 
Click here to
view this 1-hour webinar without CME or CE credit
 
 

Overview

The primary objective is to provide the target audience of oncologists, hematologist/oncologists, and other clinicians with practical knowledge and competence that helps them implement practice performance changes so that they can improve survival in their lung cancer patients with squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC), and/or without actionable mutations.

Target Audience

The target audience for this activity on managing NSCLC patients without actionable mutations includes medical oncologists, hematologists, radiation oncologists, surgical oncologists, pathologists, Fellows, Physician Assistants, oncology nurses/Nurse Practitioners, oncology pharmacists, and other allied health-care professionals involved in the treatment, care and management of patients with NSCLC. Lung cancer is treated optimally by a multi-disciplinary approach and, thus, all of the aforementioned clinician specialties are invited to participate in this activity.

Learning Objectives

PHYSICIANS
  1. Analyze how molecular and genomic characteristics of squamous cell lung carcinoma and NSCLC without actionable mutations help guide therapy decisions.
  2. Compare and contrast current and emerging strategies for relapsed NSCLC patients.
  3. Critically assess the clinical data involving novel induction and maintenance strategies for squamous NSCLC.
  4. Evaluate the role of immune therapy for NSCLC patients regardless of histology and mutation status.
NURSES
  1. Describe how molecular and genomic characteristics of squamous cell lung carcinoma and NSCLC without actionable mutations help guide therapy decisions.
  2. List current and emerging strategies for relapsed NSCLC patients.
  3. Recall the clinical data involving novel induction and maintenance strategies for squamous NSCLC.
  4. Describe the role of immune therapy for NSCLC patients regardless of histology and mutation status.
PHARMACISTS
  1. Describe how molecular and genomic characteristics of squamous cell lung carcinoma and NSCLC without actionable mutations help guide therapy decisions.
  2. List current and emerging strategies for relapsed NSCLC patients.
  3. Recall the clinical data involving novel induction and maintenance strategies for squamous NSCLC.
  4. Describe the role of immune therapy for NSCLC patients regardless of histology and mutation status.

Faculty & Disclosures

Mark A. Socinski, MD (Co-Chair)
Professor of Medicine and Thoracic Surgery
Director, Lung Cancer Section
Division of Hematology/Oncology
Co-Director, UPMC Lung Cancer center of Excellence
Co-Director, Lung and Thoracic Malignancies Program
University of Pittsburgh
UPMC Cancer Pavilion
Pittsburgh, PA

Fees for Non-CME/CE Services Received Directly from Commerical Interest or Their Agents (e.g. speakers’ bureaus): Genentech, Celgene
Contracted Research: Genentech, Celgene, AstraZeneca, Synta, BIND, Aveo, Pfizer, Clovis, Lilly
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD (Co-Chair)
Ensign Professor of Medicine
Professor of Pharmacology
Chief of Medical Oncology
Director, Thoracic Oncology Research Program
Associate Director for Translational Research
Translational Research Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale School of Medicine
New Haven, CT

Consulting Fees: Eli Lilly, Genentech/Roche, Merck, Pfizer
Contracted Research: Genentech
Scientific Advisory Boards: Biothera, Diatech, Kolltan, N of 1

Faculty
Gregory J. Riely, MD, PhD
Medical Oncologist
Thoracic Oncology Service
Vice Chair,
Clinical Trials Office
Department of Medicine
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY

Consulting Fees:: Novartis
Contracted Research:: Pfizer, Infinity, Novartis, Astellas, Roche, Millennium

LEAD NURSE PLANNER
Diane D. DePew, DSN, RN-BC

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

PLANNER & CME/CE REVIEWER
Steve Madison, RPh, MBA (BMLI Manager)

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

CME/CE PEER REVIEWER
Danielle Shafer, MD

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

Peer Review Process of Conflicts of Interest

This educational activity has been independently peer-reviewed.

Disclosure of Unlabeled Uses

This educational activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For additional information about approved uses, including approved indications, contraindications, and warnings, please refer to the prescribing information for each product or consult the Physicians' Desk Reference.

The Biomedical Learning Institute (BMLI) does not recommend the use of any agent outside of the FDA labeled indications. The opinions expressed in the educational activity are those of the faculty and do not necessarily represent the views of the BMLI. Please refer to the official FDA prescribing information for each product for discussion of approved indicated, contraindications, and warnings.

CME/CE Accreditation & Credit Designation

To receive CME/CE credit participation in the entire activity by viewing the activity and the completion of a brief evaluation form, participation in 4 pre- and post-questions, and successfully passing a CME/CE test of 4 questions.

The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Biomedical Learning Institute designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™.

Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

UAN: 0838-0000-15-003-H01-P
Credits: 1 hour (0.1 ceu)
Type of Activity: Knowledge

The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's COA.

The Biomedical Learning Institute designates this educational activity for 1 contact hour.

Accreditation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's COA refers to recognition of educational activities and does not imply approval or endorsement of any product.

Participation at the entire activity, a 70% or better score on the post-test and completion of the evaluation form is required to receive CE contact hour credit.

Physician Assistants: AAPA accepts certificates of attendance for educational activities certified for Category 1 credit from AOACCME, Prescribed credit from AAFP, and AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician Assistants may receive a maximum of 1 hour of Category 1 credit for attending this symposium.

Fellows will receive a certificate of attendance that they can submit to their accrediting organizations for continuing education credit.

Educational Support

Sincere appreciation is extended to Celgene for their generous support of this educational activity

Educational Needs

Mutations in EGF receptor, the ALK rearrangement, and VEGF receptors are the common actionable proteins in lung carcinoma for targeted therapy. While these alterations are found in adenocarcinomas, and with higher frequencies among certain subpopulations of adenocarcinoma such as never smokers, females and Asians, more than half of lung adenocarcinomas have no known actionable or driver mutation. In squamous lung carcinomas actionable mutations are nearly absent, with a prevalence of only about 3 percent. Most NSCLC is either squamous or adenocarcinoma. Thus, between 70 and 90 percent of all NSCLC patients are not associated with an actionable, driver mutation and this poses a problem to clinicians for devising strategies for their NSCLC patients with this biology. And while year after year new, targeted strategies have emerged for NSCLC with EGFR, ALK and VEGFR, oncologists today face the problem of how to best devise systemic therapies for most of their NSCLC patients without validated biomarkers to guide their decisions. The lack of widespread awareness of recent and emerging strategies to help improve outcome for a large number of NSCLC patients with this biologic characterization is a Practice Gap.

Squamous cell lung carcinoma is a significant unmet medical need. The prognosis for patients with advanced stage squamous NSCLC is dismal. Squamous cell carcinoma is the second largest subgroup of NSCLC. And squamous NSCLC accounts for about 25 to 30 percent of all lung cancers. Five-year survival for this group of NSCLC patients is less than 5 percent. All patients with advanced or metastatic NSCLC either relapse or die. More than 60,000 patients die in the US each year from squamous NSCLC, which is more than the annual deaths from breast cancer and colon cancer combined.

Unquestionably, squamous lung carcinoma, NSCLC patients without actionable mutations, and NSCLC patients who are refractory to initial systemic therapy represent a significant public health problem. For many of these patients chemotherapy is the main systemic therapy option and the role of chemotherapy is not to be underestimated. However, opportunities for new therapies and strategies are needed. Indeed, a number of different therapeutic approaches for patients with squamous NSCLC have been emerging in late-stage clinical development and include strategies involving immune therapy, targeting EGFR, and targeting VEGF/ inhibiting angiogenesis.

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