Personalized Therapies and Best Clinical Practices for Lung Cancer
2016
Overview
  • Dates of Release & Expiration: January 4, 2016 - January 4, 2017
  • Available "24/7" on-demand, to be viewed either as a CME or CE or non-accredited program
  • Expert medical oncologists
  • 8.25 Category 1 CME credits available for physicians
  • 8.25 CE credits available for nurses and pharmacists
Co-Chairs
Paul A. Bunn, Jr, MD
Distinguished Professor
James Dudley Chair in Lung Cancer Research
Professor, Medical Oncology
University of Colorado Denver
Denver, CO

Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD
Ensign Professor of Medicine
Professor of Pharmacology
Chief of Medical Oncology
Director, Thoracic Oncology Research Program
Associate Director for Translational Research
Translational Research Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale School of Medicine
New Haven, CT

 
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view this 8.25-hour webinar and earn either CME or CE credit. Requires completion of a brief evaluation form, participation in 4 pre- and post-questions, and successfully passing a CME or CE test of 4 questions
 
Click here to
view this 8.25-hour webinar without CME or CE credit
 
 

Overview

The primary objective is to provide the target audience of oncologists, hematologist/oncologists, and other clinicians with knowledge and competence on the integration of Immune therapy and novel targeted therapy into traditional chemotherapy, as well as an update on the status of NGS testing to address NSCLC patients without actionable mutations, including patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. And as always, heavy emphasis is placed in the use of interactive case studies and other learning formats to achieve the highest level of learner/audience interactivity with the faculty and the program.

Target Audience

This activity is designed to meet the educational needs of and help close Practice Gaps of medical oncologists, hematologists, radiation oncologists, surgical oncologists, pathologists, oncology pharmacists, oncology nurses/Nurse Practitioners and other allied health-care professionals involved in the treatment, care and management of patients with lung cancer, including physician assistants and fellows. Lung cancer is treated optimally by a multi-disciplinary approach of clinicians and, thus, all of the aforementioned clinician specialties are targeted for invitation.

Targeting this audience of clinicians and scientists is intended to help improve the dissemination of the most current and practical educational information of this activity required for closing Practice Gaps and improving the outcomes of NSCLC patients through maximized application of personalized medicine and best clinical practices. With the very rapidly increasing number of new targeted and immune therapies, including anti-VEGF antibodies, new small targeted molecules, and immune checkpoint inhibitors for which most do not yet have validated biomarkers, the term, "best practices" takes on increasing significance.

Learning Objectives

PHYSICIANS
  1. Understand how to devise personalized, systemic, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment strategies based upon the results of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) testing.
  2. Evaluate treatment strategies for the management of early-stage disease NSCLC patients with an identified actionable mutation.
  3. Analyze the emerging options in late stage clinical development for targeting actionable mutations other than EGFR and ALK, such as KRAS, MEK, CDK4/CDK6, HSP90 and others that are identified with NGS testing in patients with NSCLC.
  4. Compare and contrast new and existing strategies for patients with squamous NSCLC and nonsquamous NSCLC across all lines of therapy including the treatment-naïve, relapsed and maintenance settings.
  5. Analyze the evidence-based data from major Phase III trials supporting the role of an oral gherlin receptor agonist for the treatment of anorexia-cachexia in patients with advanced or unresectable NSCLC.
  6. Compare and contrast the differences between the various approved and emerging immune therapy strategies for lung cancer patients in the relapsed and initial treatment settings.
  7. Understand the differences between immune therapy and traditional systemic therapies for patients with lung cancer, based upon different mechanisms of action and drug-induced side effects and the impact of these differences on determining and measuring therapeutic efficacy of immune therapy.
  8. Compare and contrast the various strategies targeting EGFR mutations in NSCLC, including monotherapy versus combination therapy and the impact on therapy related to differences in mutations.
  9. Understand the evolving ALK landscape in NSCLC, including when and how to use second-line therapy for treatment-naïve patients and for managing patients with CNS involvement.
  10. Compare and contrast the various treatment strategies for managing acquired resistance to anti-EGFR and anti-ALK therapy, including which, when and how to use serial biopsy.
NURSES
  1. Describe personalized, systemic, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment strategies based upon the results of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) testing.
  2. Recall treatment strategies for the management of early-stage disease NSCLC patients with an identified actionable mutation.
  3. List the emerging options in late stage clinical development for targeting actionable mutations other than EGFR and ALK, such as KRAS, MEK, CDK4/CDK6, HSP90 and others that are identified with NGS testing in patients with NSCLC.
  4. Identify new and existing strategies for patients with squamous NSCLC and nonsquamous NSCLC across all lines of therapy including the treatment-naïve, relapsed and maintenance settings.
  5. Define the evidence-based data from major Phase III trials supporting the role of an oral gherlin receptor agonist for the treatment of anorexia-cachexia in patients with advanced or unresectable NSCLC.
  6. Describe the differences between the various approved and emerging immune therapy strategies for lung cancer patients in the relapsed and initial treatment settings.
  7. Recall the differences between immune therapy and traditional systemic therapies for patients with lung cancer, based upon different mechanisms of action and drug-induced side effects and the impact of these differences on determining and measuring therapeutic efficacy of immune therapy.
  8. List the various strategies targeting EGFR mutations in NSCLC, including monotherapy versus combination therapy and the impact on therapy related to differences in mutations.
  9. Describe the current ALK landscape in NSCLC, including when to use second-line therapy for treatment-naïve patients and for managing patients with CNS involvement.
  10. Recall the various treatment strategies for managing acquired resistance to anti-EGFR and anti-ALK therapy, including which, when and how to use serial biopsy.
PHARMACISTS
  1. Describe personalized, systemic, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment strategies based upon the results of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) testing.
  2. Recall treatment strategies for the management of early-stage disease NSCLC patients with an identified actionable mutation.
  3. List the emerging options in late stage clinical development for targeting actionable mutations other than EGFR and ALK, such as KRAS, MEK, CDK4/CDK6, HSP90 and others that are identified with NGS testing in patients with NSCLC.
  4. Identify new and existing strategies for patients with squamous NSCLC and nonsquamous NSCLC across all lines of therapy including the treatment-naïve, relapsed and maintenance settings.
  5. Define the evidence-based data from major Phase III trials supporting the role of an oral gherlin receptor agonist for the treatment of anorexia-cachexia in patients with advanced or unresectable NSCLC.
  6. Describe the differences between the various approved and emerging immune therapy strategies for lung cancer patients in the relapsed and initial treatment settings.
  7. Recall the differences between immune therapy and traditional systemic therapies for patients with lung cancer, based upon different mechanisms of action and drug-induced side effects and the impact of these differences on determining and measuring therapeutic efficacy of immune therapy.
  8. List the various strategies targeting EGFR mutations in NSCLC, including monotherapy versus combination therapy and the impact on therapy related to differences in mutations.
  9. Describe the current ALK landscape in NSCLC, including when to use second-line therapy for treatment-naïve patients and for managing patients with CNS involvement.
  10. Recall the various treatment strategies for managing acquired resistance to anti-EGFR and anti-ALK therapy, including which, when and how to use serial biopsy.

Faculty & Disclosures

Paul A. Bunn, Jr, MD (Co-Chair)
Distinguished Professor
James Dudley Chair in Lung Cancer Research
Professor, Medical Oncology
University of Colorado Denver
Denver, CO

Consulting Fees: Amgen, Astellas, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Lilly, Celgene, Merck, Novartis, Genentech/Roche, AstraZeneca, Daiichi Sankyo, Clovis Oncology
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD (Co-Chair)
Ensign Professor of Medicine
Professor of Pharmacology
Chief of Medical Oncology
Director, Thoracic Oncology Research Program
Associate Director for Translational Research
Translational Research Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale School of Medicine
New Haven, CT

Consulting Fees: Eli Lilly, Genentech/Roche, Gilead, Merck, Pfizer
Scientific Advisory Boards: Biothera, Diatech, Kolltan, N of 1
Clinical Trials Support / Grant: Genentech

Faculty
Philip D. Bonomi, MD
Professor and Director
Division of Hematology/Oncology
Rush University Medical Center
Chicago, IL

Consulting Fees: Pfizer, Lilly, Merck, Helsinn

Robert C. Doebele, MD, PhD
Associate Professor
Division of Medical Oncology
University of Colorado Denver
Denver, CO

Receipt of Intellectual Property Rights / Patent Holder: Abbott Molecular, Chugai, Blueprint Medicines, Ariad, GVKbio
Consulting Fees: Array BioPharma, Ariad, Clovis, AstraZeneca
Contracted Research: Mirati Therapeutics, Loxo Oncology

Edward B. Garon, MD
Associate Clinical Professor
Department of Medicine
Director, Thoracic Oncology Program
UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center
Los Angeles, CA

Contracted Research: BMS, Merck, Novartis, Pfizer, AstraZeneca, Genentech, and Eli Lilly
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Joel W. Neal, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Division of Oncology
Stanford Cancer Institute
Stanford University
Palo Alto, CA

Consulting Fees: CARET Physicians Resource Management, Clovis Oncology, Nektar Therapeutics, Boehringer Ingelheim
Contracted Research: Arqule, Boehringer Ingelheim, Exelixis, Genentech/Roche, Merck, Nektar Therapeutics, Novartis
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Suresh S. Ramalingam, MD
Professor of Hematology/Oncology
Director
Lung Cancer Program
Winship Cancer Institute
Emory University
Atlanta, Georgia

Consulting Fees: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck, Lilly, Genentech

Gregory J. Riely, MD, PhD
Medical Oncologist
Thoracic Oncology Service
Vice Chair,
Clinical Trials Office
Department of Medicine
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY

Consulting Fees: Novartis
Contracted Research: Novartis, Pfizer, Millennium, and Roche

David R. Spigel, MD
Director, Lung Cancer Research Program
Sarah Cannon Research Institute
Tennessee Oncology
Nashville, TN

Other (Uncompensated Advisor): Genentech, Bristol-Myers Squibb

Heather A. Wakelee, MD
Assistant Professor
Department of Medicine
Division of Oncology
Stanford Cancer Institute
Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center
Stanford, CA

Consulting Fees: Peregrine
Contracted Research: Celgene, Roche/Genentech, Lily, Pfizer, Novartis, Clovis, AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Exelixis, Xcovery
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

H. Jack West, MD
Medical Director
Thoracic Oncology Program
Swedish Cancer Institute
President and CEO
Global Resource for Advancing Cancer Education (GRACE)
Seattle, WA

Consulting Fees: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Genentech/Roche, Novartis, and Abbvie
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

LEAD NURSE PLANNER
Diane D. DePew, DSN, RN-BC

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

PLANNER & CME/CE REVIEWER
Steve Madison, RPh, MBA (BMLI Manager)

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

CME/CE PEER REVIEWER
Danielle Shafer, MD

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

Nurse Faculty & Disclosures

Tammy E. Allred, RN, OCN
Thoracic Nurse Navigator
University of North Carolina
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
Chapel Hill, NC

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

Marianne J. Davies, DNP, MSN, RN, APRN, CNS-BC, ACNP-BC, AOCNP
Clinical Instructor in Nursing
Thoracic Oncology Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale Schools of Nursing and Medicine
New Haven, CT

Fees for Non-CME Services Received Directly from Commercial Interest or their Agents: Genentech, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Novartis, Merck

Pharmacist Faculty & Disclosures

Jim M. Koeller, MS
Professor,
University of Texas at Austin
College of Pharmacy,
Pharmacotherapy Division
Adjoint Professor
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
School of Medicine, Pharmacotherapy Education & Research
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
San Antonio, TX

Fees for Non-CME Services Received Directly from Commercial Interest or their Agents: Lilly, Merck

Peer Review Process of Conflicts of Interest

This educational activity has been independently peer-reviewed.

Disclosure of Unlabeled Uses

This educational activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For additional information about approved uses, including approved indications, contraindications, and warnings, please refer to the prescribing information for each product or consult the Physicians' Desk Reference.

The Biomedical Learning Institute (BMLI) does not recommend the use of any agent outside of the FDA labeled indications. The opinions expressed in the educational activity are those of the faculty and do not necessarily represent the views of the BMLI. Please refer to the official FDA prescribing information for each product for discussion of approved indicated, contraindications, and warnings.

CME/CE Accreditation & Credit Designation

To receive CME/CE credit participation in the entire activity by viewing the activity and the completion of a brief evaluation form, participation in 4 pre- and post-questions, and successfully passing a CME/CE test of 4 questions.

The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Biomedical Learning Institute designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 8.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.

Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

UAN: 0838-0000-15-004-H01-P
Credits: 8.25 hours (0.825 ceus)
Type of Activity: Knowledge

The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's COA.

The Biomedical Learning Institute designates this educational activity for 8.25 contact hours.

Accreditation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's COA refers to recognition of educational activities and does not imply approval or endorsement of any product.

Participation at the entire activity, a 70% or better score on the post-test and completion of the evaluation form is required to receive CE contact hour credit.

Physician Assistants: AAPA accepts certificates of attendance for educational activities certified for Category 1 credit from AOACCME, Prescribed credit from AAFP, and AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician Assistants may receive a maximum of 8.25 hours of Category 1 credit for attending this symposium.

Fellows will receive a certificate of attendance that they can submit to their accrediting organizations for continuing education credit.

Educational Support

Sincere appreciation is extended to the following companies for their generous support of this educational activity

Lilly
Genentech
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Celgene
Merck
Astellas
Helsinn
Novartis
Clovis Oncology
Foundation Medicine

Educational Needs

Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in the US. In 2014 according the American Cancer Society Facts and Figures there will be an estimated 224,210 new cases and 159,260 deaths from lung cancer. Despite the large numbers of deaths occurring with this malignancy there is cause to be optimistic because of a large and increasing number of new lung cancer drugs, tests enabling patients to receive the drugs that will be most beneficial to them on a personalized therapy basis, and, novel treatment strategies to use all of these tools that have become public information since we conducted last year’s "Seventh Annual Symposium on Personalized Therapies and Best Clinical Practices for Lung Cancer."

Despite the overall poor outcome, lung cancer patient outcomes are improving. Patients are living longer and with a better quality of life because physicians and other healthcare professionals have access to the information to gain the knowledge and competence to treat, care for and manage their patients. Physicians have a better understanding of lung cancer cell biology, an increasing ability to personalize existing and emerging systemic lung cancer drug therapy because of molecular and genomic diagnostic tests, the availability to use next-generation systemic lung cancer therapy and expanded uses of many existing systemic lung cancer drug therapies.

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