Integrating Immune Therapies & Targeted Therapies Into Standards of Care for Hematologic and Solid Malignancies 2018
Overview
  • Dates of Release & Expiration: January 1, 2018 - January 1, 2019
  • Available "24/7" on-demand, to be viewed either as a CME or CE or non-accredited program
  • Expert medical oncologists
  • 8.75 Category 1 CME credits available for physicians
  • 8.75 CE credits available for nurses and pharmacists
Co-Chairs
Paul A. Bunn, Jr., MD
University of Colorado Denver
Denver, CO


Leo I. Gordon, MD
Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University
Chicago, IL

 
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view this 8.75-hour webinar and earn either CME/CE credit. Requires completion of a brief evaluation form, participation in pre- and post-questions, and successfully passing a brief CME/CE test
 
Click here to
view this 8.75-hour webinar without CME or CE credit
 
 

Overview

The overall objective is to review the ongoing integration of many novel immune therapies and novel targeted therapies into the evolving standards of care, including the use of chemotherapy, for many malignancies. Standards of are care are evolving due to a continuing stream of FDA drug approvals, the evolving NCCN and ASCO guidelines and the increasing number of ongoing investigational clinical trials available to patients now.

EDUCATIONAL STATEMENT OF NEED

The educational need for this activity is the result of recent and continuing FDA approvals of new immune therapies and new targeted therapies for a large number of solid and hematologic malignancies. And because for many malignancies these new therapies have similar if not the same indications and usage, it is essential that their new applications within the current standards of care be evaluated concurrently in one symposium. With an understanding of the most current clinical trials’ data and FDA indications involving immune and targeted therapies, it will be possible for HCPs to deliver optimal patient care for many malignancies, resulting in improved outcome.

Target Audience

This activity is designed to meet the educational needs of medical oncologists, hematologists, radiation oncologists, surgical oncologists, pathologists, oncology pharmacists, oncology nurses/Advanced Nurse Practitioners, and other allied healthcare professionals involved in the treatment, care and management of patients with solid and hematologic malignancies that are responsive to immune and targeted therapies. Cancer Is treated optimally by a multi-disciplinary approach of clinicians, and thus, all of the aforementioned clinical specialties are targeted for invitation to this CME/CE activity.

Learning Objectives

PHYSICIANS
  1. Understand the differences in efficacy and toxicity between immunotherapies, new-generation targeted therapies, and traditional targeted therapy and chemotherapy.
  2. Compare and contrast the various emerging and current therapies for pancreatic cancer.
  3. Compare and contrast the targeted and emerging immune therapies for leukemia.
  4. Analyze the different strategies for non-small cell lung cancer involving immune therapy versus targeted therapy and regimens with chemotherapy backbones.
  5. Devise various treatment strategies using immunotherapy and targeted therapy utilizing monotherapy, combinations and sequencing of therapies for melanoma.
  6. Analyze the various investigational strategies for HER2 and non-HER2 gastric and esophageal cancers.
  7. Describe the emerging targeted and immune therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma.
  8. Assess the new and emerging data utilizing immune therapy and targeted therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma.
  9. Compare and contrast the use of the immune therapy and targeted therapy for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, and Follicular Lymphoma.
  10. Describe the various new and emerging strategies for treating the following leukemia with systemic therapy: AML, ALL and CLL.
  11. Evaluate the different therapeutic strategies for Multiple Myeloma, including new-generation targeted therapy, immunotherapy with checkpoint inhibition and with IMiDs, in both combination and monotherapy regimens.
  12. Integrate the new checkpoint inhibitor immune therapies and the established and emerging targeted strategies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
  13. Describe the various immune and targeted therapy strategies for metastatic urothelial carcinoma and metastatic bladder cancers.
  14. Compare and contrast the different immunotherapy and targeted therapy strategies for metastatic and relapsed squamous cell Head & Neck cancer.
NURSES
  1. Review the differences in efficacy and toxicity between immunotherapies, new-generation targeted therapies, and traditional targeted therapy and chemotherapy.
  2. List the various emerging and current therapies for pancreatic cancer.
  3. Recognize the differences between the targeted and emerging immune therapies for leukemia.
  4. Recognize the different strategies for non-small cell lung cancer involving immune therapy versus targeted therapy and regimens with chemotherapy backbones.
  5. Identify various treatment strategies using immunotherapy and targeted therapy utilizing monotherapy, combinations and sequencing of therapies for melanoma.
  6. Review the various investigational strategies for HER2 and non-HER2 gastric and esophageal cancers.
  7. List the emerging targeted and immune therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma.
  8. Recall the new and emerging data utilizing immune therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma.
  9. Outline the use of the immune therapy and targeted therapy for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, and Follicular Lymphoma.
  10. Review the various new and emerging strategies for treating the following leukemia with systemic therapy: AML, ALL and CLL.
  11. Define the different therapeutic strategies for Multiple Myeloma, including new-generation targeted therapy, immunotherapy with checkpoint inhibition and with IMiDs, in both combination and monotherapy regimens.
  12. Integrate the new checkpoint inhibitor immune therapies and the established and emerging targeted and immune strategies for renal cell carcinoma.
  13. Describe the various immune and targeted therapy strategies for metastatic urothelial carcinoma and metastatic bladder cancers.
  14. List the different immunotherapy and targeted therapy strategies for metastatic and relapsed squamous cell Head & Neck cancer.
PHARMACISTS
  1. Review the differences in efficacy and toxicity between immunotherapies, new-generation targeted therapies, and traditional targeted therapy and chemotherapy.
  2. List the various emerging and current therapies for pancreatic cancer.
  3. Recognize the differences between the targeted and emerging immune therapies for leukemia.
  4. Recognize the different strategies for non-small cell lung cancer involving immune therapy versus targeted therapy and regimens with chemotherapy backbones.
  5. Identify various treatment strategies using immunotherapy and targeted therapy utilizing monotherapy, combinations and sequencing of therapies for melanoma.
  6. Review the various investigational strategies for HER2 and non-HER2 gastric and esophageal cancers.
  7. List the emerging targeted and immune therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma.
  8. Recall the new and emerging data utilizing immune therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma.
  9. Outline the use of the immune therapy and targeted therapy for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, and Follicular Lymphoma.
  10. Review the various new and emerging strategies for treating the following leukemia with systemic therapy: AML, ALL and CLL.
  11. Define the different therapeutic strategies for Multiple Myeloma, including new-generation targeted therapy, immunotherapy with checkpoint inhibition and with IMiDs, in both combination and monotherapy regimens.
  12. Integrate the new checkpoint inhibitor immune therapies and the established and emerging targeted and immune strategies for renal cell carcinoma.
  13. Describe the various immune and targeted therapy strategies for metastatic urothelial carcinoma and metastatic bladder cancers.
  14. List the different immunotherapy and targeted therapy strategies for metastatic and relapsed squamous cell Head & Neck cancer.

Faculty & Disclosures

Paul Bunn, Jr., MD (Co-Chair)
(Co-Chair & Course Director)
Distinguished Professor
James Dudley Chair in Lung Cancer Research
Professor, Medical Oncology
University of Colorado, Denver
Founder and Past Executive Director of the IASLC
(International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer)
Denver, CO

Consulting Fees: Amgen, Astellas, AZ, BMS, Celgene, Clovis, Daiichi, Genentech/Roche, Merck, Novartis, Lilly

Leo I. Gordon, MD
Abby and John Friend Professor of Cancer Research
Professor in Medicine
Director Lymphoma Program
Co-Director Hematologic Malignancies Program
Division of Hematology/Oncology
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University
Medical Director of the John and Lillian Matthews Center for Cellular Therapy
Chicago, IL

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Thomas A. Abrams, MD
Senior Physician
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Department of Gastrointestinal Malignancies
Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA

Consulting Fees: BMS, Bayer, Celgene, SIRTEX, Aduro
Contracted Research: Lilly
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Philippe Armand, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Staff, Medical Oncology
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA

Consulting Fees: BMS, Merck, Pfizer
Other: Research Support (Institutional) BMS, Merck, Pfizer, Affimed, Roche, Tensha
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Marianne Davies, DNP, ACNP, AOCNP
Clinical Instructor in Nursing
Thoracic Oncology Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale Schools of Nursing and Medicine
New Haven, CT

Consulting Fees: AstraZeneca
Fees for non-CME/CE Services Received Directly from Commercial Interest or Their Agents (e.g. speakers’ bureaus): Genentech, BMS, AstraZeneca, Merck

Tanya Dorff, MD
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine
Keck School of Medicine of USC
Los Angeles, CA

Consulting Fees: Bayer, Eisai, EMD Serono, Jansenn, Prometheus
Fees for non-CME/CE Services Received Directly from Commercial Interest or Their Agents (e.g. speakers’ bureaus): Exelixis, Prometheus
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Edward Garon, MD
Professor of Medicine and
Director, Department of Thoracic Oncology
UCLA Jonsson Cancer center
Los Angeles, CA

Contracted Research: AstraZeneca, Pfizer, Novartis, Genentech, Eli Lilly, BMS, Merck, Boehringer-Ingelheim, Mirati
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Richard J. Gralla, MD, FACP
Professor of Medicine
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Jacobi Medical Center
Bronx, NY

Consulting Fees: Merck, Helsinn
Fees for non-CME/CE Services Received Directly from Commercial Interest or Their Agents (e.g. speakers’ bureaus): Merck, Helsinn Contracted Research: Merck
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Timothy F. Greten, MD
M.D. Senior Investigator
Center for Cancer Research National Cancer Institute
Former Associate Professor of Medicine
Department of Gastroenterology and Hematology
Hannover Medical School
Germany

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Elias Jabbour, MD
Associate Professor
Department of Leukemia
Division of Cancer Medicine
The University of Texas
MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, TX

Consulting Fees: Amgen, Pfizer, Takeda, BMS
Contracted Research: Amgen, Pfizer, Takeda, BMS
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Geoffrey Y. Ku, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Attending Physician
Weill Cornell Medical School
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY

Consulting Fees: BMS, Eli Lilly, Merck
Contracted Research: Aduro, Arog, AstraZeneca, BMS, Incyte, Merck, Pieris
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Corey J. Langer, MD
Professor of Medicine
Director of Thoracic Oncology
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA

Grant/Research Support:Pfizer, Lilly, Genentech, OSI (Astelas), Merck, GSK, Nektar, Advantage, Clovis, Inovio, Ariad, StemCentrx
Scientific Advisor: AbbVie, Bristol Myers Squibb, ImClone, Pfizer, Lilly, AstraZeneca, Novartis, Roche/Genentech, Bayer/Onyx, Abbott, Morphotek, Biodesix, Clarient, Caris Dx, Vertex, Synta, Celgene, Boehringer-Ingelheim, Hospira, Helsinn, Clovis, Ariad (Takeda)
DSMC: Lilly, Amgen, Synta, Agennix, SWOG, Peregrine, Incyte
CME: PIK; PER; NOCR; Imedex, CCO; RTP, MLG, TRM
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Jim M. Koeller, MS
Professor,
University of Texas at Austin
College of Pharmacy,
Pharmacotherapy Division
Adjoint Professor
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
School of Medicine, Pharmacotherapy Education & Research
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
San Antonio, TX

Fees for non-CME/CE Services Received Directly from Commercial Interest or Their Agents (e.g. speakers’ bureaus): Lilly

S. Vincent Rajkumar, MD
Professor of Medicine
Chair, Mayo Clinic Myeloma Amyloidosis Dysproteinemia Group
Associate Editor, Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Section Editor, Leukemia
The Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN
Chair, ECOG Myeloma Committee

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Stanley R. Riddell, MD
Professor, School of Medicine
University of Washington
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Seattle, WA

Receipt of Intellectual Property Rights / Patent Holder: Juno Therapeutics
Consulting Fees: Juno Therapeutics, Cell Medica, Adaptive Biotechnologies
Contracted Research: Juno Therapeutics
Ownership Interest: Juno Therapeutics
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Susan Slovin, MD, PhD
Attending Physician, Member
Genitourinary Oncology Service
Sidney Kimmel Center for Prostate and Urologic Cancers
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Professor of Medicine
Weill Cornell Medical College
New York, NY

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

David Spigel, MD
Director, Lung Cancer Research Program
Sarah Cannon Research Institute
Tennessee Oncology
Nashville, TN
I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD
Director, Donald A. Adam
Comprehensive Melanoma Research Center
Senior Member, Moffitt Cancer Center
Professor and Associate Chair,
Department of Oncologic Sciences
University of South Florida
Tampa, FL
Consulting Fees: BMS, Merck, Astra Zeneca, Pfizer, Novartis, GSK, Genentech, EMD Serono, Incyte
Ownership Interest (stocks, stock options, or other ownership interest excluding diversified mutual funds): Altor, CytoMx, Celldex
Receipt of Intellectual Property Rights / Patent Holder: Biodesix
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

H. Jack West, MD
Medical Director
Thoracic Oncology Program
Swedish Cancer Institute
President and CEO
Global Resource for Advancing Cancer Education (GRACE)
Seattle, WA

Consulting Fees: Ariad, Astra Zeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, Genentech/Roche, Takeda
Fees for non-CME/CE Services Received Directly from Commercial Interest or Their Agents (e.g. speakers’ bureaus): Ariad, Genentech/Roche, Takeda
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

BioMedical Learning Institute

LEAD NURSE PLANNER
Diane D. DePew, DSN, RN-BC
I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

PLANNER & CME/CE REVIEWER
Stephen G. Madison, BSPharm, MBA, CHCP (BMLI Manager)
I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

CME/CE PEER REVIEWER
Danielle Shafer, MD
I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

Peer Review Process of Conflicts of Interest

This educational activity has been independently peer-reviewed.

Disclosure of Unlabeled Uses

This educational activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For additional information about approved uses, including approved indications, contraindications, and warnings, please refer to the prescribing information for each product or consult the Physicians' Desk Reference.

The Biomedical Learning Institute (BMLI) does not recommend the use of any agent outside of the FDA labeled indications. The opinions expressed in the educational activity are those of the faculty and do not necessarily represent the views of the BMLI. Please refer to the official FDA prescribing information for each product for discussion of approved indicated, contraindications, and warnings.

CME/CE Accreditation & Credit Designation

To receive CME/CE credit participation in the entire activity by viewing the activity and the completion of a brief evaluation form, participation in pre- and post-questions, and successfully passing a CME/CE test.

The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Biomedical Learning Institute designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 8.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.

Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.


The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

UAN: 0838-0000-17-005-H01-P
Credits: 8.75 hours (0.825 ceus)
Type of Activity: Knowledge

The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's COA.

The Biomedical Learning Institute designates this educational activity for 8.75 contact hours.

Accreditation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's COA refers to recognition of educational activities and does not imply approval or endorsement of any product.

Participation at the entire activity, a 70% or better score on the post-test and completion of the evaluation form is required to receive CE contact hour credit.

Physician Assistants: AAPA accepts certificates of attendance for educational activities certified for Category 1 credit from AOACCME, Prescribed credit from AAFP, and AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician Assistants may receive a maximum of 8.75 hours of Category 1 credit for attending this activity.

Fellows will receive a certificate of attendance that they can submit to their accrediting organizations for continuing education credit.

Educational Support

Sincere appreciation is extended to Bayer, Celgene, Lilly, Novartis, MEI Pharma, Pfizer, Seattle Genetics for their generous support of this educational activity

Endorsed as an Educational Activity by

Global Resource for Advancing Cancer Education (GRACE)

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