CME/CE-Accredited Webcasts, Presentation and Audio Downloads
Treatment of Elderly Patients With Cancer
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Overview of This CME/CE-Accredited Educational Activity

Your Options for Methods of Participation are:
  1. View and/or listen to any of the sessions (listed below) via Webcast
  2. Download any slides
  3. Download any audio only as MP3s or Podcasts

Sessions can be individually reviewed for credit. You can participate in as few or as many as you desire.

CME-Accredited Educational Activity Dates and Time to Complete
Date of release: April 3, 2013
Date expires (CME credit will not be available): April 3, 2014
Average time to complete each individual session: 20 minutes
Time to complete entire activity: 8 hours
Overview

The primary objective of the Treatment of Elderly Patients With Cancer is to provide the target audience of oncologists, hematologists, oncology and hematology fellows, oncology nurses, Nurse Practitioners, oncology pharmacists, physician assistants and allied healthcare professionals treating elderly cancer patients with the practical knowledge and how to apply best practices, including personalized systemic therapies for improving the outcomes of their patients.

Strategies to help oncologists, hematologists, Nurse Practitioners, nurses, pharmacists and other healthcare professionals treat malignancy and provide supportive care for their elderly patients are long overdue. Thisone-day CME/CE symposium has been under development for nearly two years to address this vitally important need.

This activity is a must for clinicians treating elderly cancer patients. Using patient case studies for all presentations.

An additional benefit to many participants is that this activity provides up to 8 hours of CME/CE credits to help fulfill mandatory State licensure requirements involving elderly patient care, pain management and end-of-life care.

Educational Needs Summary

Cancer is a disease of the elderly. Yet until very recently, limited data has been available on treating malignancy in elderly cancer to help oncologists/hematologists, nurses, pharmacists and other healthcare professionals provide these patients with better care. Cancer patients age 65 and older have too often been unnecessarily deemed to be unfit for systemic therapy and have, therefore, suffered from poor outcomes despite the possibility for extended survival and/or improved quality of life with an increasing number of "user-friendly" systemic therapies and treatment strategies. It is estimated that half of elderly cancer patients who are eligible for systemic therapy are either under treated or not treated with systemic therapy. To emphasize this problem, for elderly lung cancer patients who are otherwise eligible or fit for therapy of their malignancy, the estimate of undertreatment with systemic therapy may be as high as 75%. The difficulty in defining "fit" older cancer patients adds to the challenge of optimal therapy selection. Thus, a significant need exists for this special CME/CE activity.

The following is list of all sessions

 
Session 1
THE ELDERLY CANCER PATIENT and SOLID MALIGNANCIES
a
The Aging Process: Who is Considered Old?
Hyman Muss
b
Assessing Elderly Patients: Determining Who Can Tolerate Systemic Therapy?
Arti Hurria
c
Breast Cancer - a model for treating solid malignancies in the elderly
Hyman Muss
d
Expert Roundtable Panel Discussion and Q & A
Faculty & Learners from live course
 
Session 2
SOLID MALIGNANCIES
a
Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy for Elderly Patients With Colorectal Cancer
Richard Goldberg
b
Treatment of Elderly Patients With Prostate Cancer
Edwin Posadas
c
The Use of Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy for Elderly Patients With Metastatic NSCLC
Jared Weiss
d
The Use of Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy for Elderly Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer
Fairooz F. Kabbinavar
e
Expert Roundtable Panel Discussion and Q & A
Faculty & Learners from live course
 
Session 3
HEMATOLOGIC MALIGNANCIES
a
Challenges of Treatment for Older Patients With NHL and HD
Paul Hamlin
b
Managing Elderly Patients With Multiple Myeloma
Nikhil Munshi
c
Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Older Adult
Harry Erba
d
Frontline Therapy for Elderly CLL
Michael Keating
e
Expert Roundtable Panel Discussion and Q & A
Faculty & Learners from live course
 
Session 4
SUPPORTIVE CARE and CUTANEOUS MALIGNANCIES
a
Targeted and Immune Therapy for Cutaneous Malignancies Definite progress, but can these drugs be given safely to the elderly?
Jeffrey Weber
b
Bone Health and Bone Metastases in Elderly Cancer Patients
James Berenson
c
Palliative Care Considerations in Older Patients A Focus on Pain Approaches and End of Life Decisions
Richard Gralla
d
Expert Roundtable Panel Discussion and Q & A
Faculty & Learners from live course
Educational Objectives

Based on the data identified in the Needs Assessment and Physician Practice Gap Identification, the following Learning Objectives have been developed for this activity:
PHYSICIAN LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  1. Understand the barriers to under treatment or lack of treatment of elderly cancer patients with systemic therapies for the major solid-tumor and hematologic malignancies.
  2. Evaluate and analyze the data required and tools available to conduct an up-to-date comprehensive geriatric assessment for cancer patients.
  3. Analyze the physiologic characteristics of elderly cancer patients regarding their ability to tolerate systemic chemotherapy, targeted therapy and supportive care.
  4. Enumerate the major biologic patient-specific characteristics that influence outcome for elderly cancer patients.
  5. Review the current clinical data supporting the use of standard systemic therapy for malignancies in younger patient populations and compare and contrast it with the applications of this therapy for elderly cancer patients.
  6. Devise strategies for treating and caring for elderly cancer patients with standard systemic therapies that are otherwise reserved for younger patients.
  7. Understand which comorbidities in elderly cancer patients can be successfully managed to enable these patients to receive systemic therapy that is standard for younger patients.
  8. Explain the rationale for enrolling elderly cancer patients in clinical trials to receive systemic therapies otherwise reserved for younger patients.
  9. Explain the reasons why elderly patients have courses of disease progression that differ from younger patients for certain malignancies.
  10. Devise protocols enabling the use of consolidation and maintenance therapies in major solid and hematologic malignancies for elderly cancer patients that are effective for younger patients.
  11. Reevaluate the process for determining the eligibility criteria for elderly cancer patients to receive systemic therapy with standard doses and administration schedules.
  12. Compare and contrast the different strategies for treating bone metastases and skeletal related events in elderly patients.
  13. Review and evaluate the strategies for managing patients transitioning to hospice.
PHARMACIST AND NURSING LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  1. Identify the barriers to under treatment of elderly cancer patients with systemic therapies for many malignancies.
  2. Recall the data required and tools available to conduct an up-to-date comprehensive geriatric assessment for cancer patients.
  3. Identify the physiologic characteristics of elderly cancer patients regarding their ability to tolerate systemic chemotherapy, targeted therapy and supportive care.
  4. Outline the major biologic patient-specific characteristics that influence outcome for elderly cancer patients.
  5. Describe the current clinical data supporting the use of standard systemic therapy for malignancies in younger patient populations and compare and contrast it with the applications of this therapy for elderly cancer patients.
  6. Describe the strategies for treating and caring for elderly cancer patients with standard systemic therapies that are otherwise reserved for younger patients.
  7. Recall which comorbidities in elderly cancer patients can be successfully managed to enable these patients to receive systemic therapy that is standard for younger patients.
  8. List the rationale for enrolling elderly cancer patients in clinical trials to receive systemic therapies otherwise reserved for younger patients.
  9. Identify the reasons why elderly patients have courses of disease progression that differ from younger patients for certain malignancies.
  10. List protocols and procedures enabling the use ofconsolidation and maintenance therapies in major solid and hematologic malignancies for elderly cancer patients that are effective for younger patients.
  11. Define the process for determining the eligibility criteria for elderly cancer patients to receive systemic therapy with standard doses and administration schedules.
  12. Identify the different strategies for treating bone metastases and skeletal related events in elderly patients.
  13. Describe the strategies for managing elderly patients transitioning to hospice.
Target Audience

This activity is designed for medical oncologists, hematologists, pharmacists, nurses, Nurse Practitioners, and other allied health-care professionals involved in the management of elderly patients with cancer, including physician assistants and fellows. Elderly patients with cancer are treated optimally by a multi-disciplinary approach of clinicians and, thus, all of the aforementioned clinician specialties are targeted for invitation to this activity.

CME/CE Accreditation & Credit Designation

To receive CME/CE credit attendance at the entire activity and the successful completion of the post-test and evaluation form is required.

The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Biomedical Learning Institute designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 8 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.

Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

UAN: 0838-0000-13-001-H01-P
Credits: 8.0 hours (0.8 ceu)
Type of Activity: Knowledge

The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's COA.

The Biomedical Learning Institute designates this educational activity for 8.0 contact hours.

Accreditation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's COA refers to recognition of educational activities and does not imply approval or endorsement of any product.

Participation at the entire activity, a 70% or better score on the post-test and completion of the evaluation form is required to receive CE contact hour credit.

Physician Assistants: AAPA accepts certificates of attendance for educational activities certified for Category 1 credit from AOACCME, Prescribed credit from AAFP, and AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician Assistants may receive a maximum of 8 hours of Category 1 credit for attending this symposium.

Fellows will receive a certificate of attendance that they can submit to their accrediting organizations for continuing education credit.

The Biomedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Biomedical Learning Institute designates this enduring material for a maximum of 8 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

CME Certificate or Certificate of Participation

The relevant section(s) of the Evaluation Form pertaining to the session(s) of the enduring materials you have viewed or listened to, and the Request for Credit Form must be completed and submitted to the Biomedical Learning Institute following your participation in the enduring material educational activity to obtain CME credit. Physicians and other participants will be able to print their certificates after they complete these Forms.
Faculty Affiliations and Disclosures

Arti Hurria, MD (Co-Chair)
Associate Professor of Medicine
Director, Cancer and Aging Research Program
Department of Medical Oncology
City of Hope
Duarte, CA
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Geriatric Oncology

Consulting Fees: GTX, Seattle Genetics
Contracted Research: GSK, Celgene

  Michael J. Keating, MB, BS
Professor of Medicine and Internist
Department of Leukemia
Division of Cancer Medicine
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, TX

Consulting Fees: Roche, Celgene, GSK
Fees for Non-CME Services Received Directly from Commercial Interest or their Agents: Xcenda
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Hyman B. Muss, MD (Co-Chair)
Professor of Medicine and Oncology
Director, Geriatric Oncology Program
University of North Carolina
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
Chapel Hill, NC

Consulting Fees: Wyeth/Pfizer, Eisai
Other: Member of the Board of Directors for Society of Translational Oncology (Treasurer)
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation .

  Nikhil C. Munshi, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Associate Director of the Jerome Lipper Myeloma Center
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA

Consulting Fees: Celgene, Millennium, Onyx, Merck
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

James R. Berenson, MD
Medical & Scientific Director
Institute for Myeloma & Bone Cancer Research
Los Angeles, CA

Consulting Fees: Amgen, Novartis, Medtronic
Fees for Non-CME Services Received Directly from Commercial Interest or their Agents: Amgen, Novartis, Medtronic
Contracted Research: Amgen, Novartis, Medtronic
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

  Edwin M. Posadas, MD, FACP
Clinical Director,
Genitourinary Medical Oncology Program
Cedars-Sinai's Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute
Los Angeles, CA

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

Deborah A. Boyle RN, MSN, AOCNS, FAAN
Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist
University of California Irvine Medical Center
Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
Orange, CA

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

  Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD
Director, Donald A. Adam Comprehensive Melanoma
Research Center
Senior Member, Moffitt Cancer Center
Professor and Associate Chair
Department of Oncologic Sciences
University of South Florida
Tampa, FL

Salary: Altor, Genesis Biopharma
Consulting Fees: BMS, Genentech, GSK, Abbott, Novartis
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.


Harry P. Erba, MD, PhD
Executive Officer,
Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG)
Professor, Internal Medicine
Director, Hematology Malignancy Program
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Birmingham, AL

Fees for Non-CME Services Received Directly from Commercial Interest or their Agents: Celgene, Novartis, Incyte
Contracted Research: Ambit, Ascenta, Chroma, Eli Lilly, Genzyme, Millennium, Novartis, Sanofi-Aventis, Sunesis
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

  Jared Weiss, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Division of Hematology and Oncology
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC

Contracted Research: Celgene, Astellas, GSK, Acceleron
Ownership Interest: Pharmacyclics, Dendreon
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

Richard M. Goldberg, MD
Professor of Medicine
The Ohio State University
Physician-in-Chief of OSUCCC,
James Cancer Hospital & Richard J. Solove Research Institute
Associate Director of Outreach
Comprehensive Cancer Center at The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH

Other: Lilly, ASMB

  Diane D. DePew, DSN, RN-BC (LEAD NURSE PLANNER)


I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

Richard J. Gralla, MD
Chief of Hematology-Oncology
Vice President of Cancer Services
North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System
New York, NY

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

  Steve Madison, RPh, MBA (BMLI Manager, PLANNER & CME/CE REVIEWER)


I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

Paul A. Hamlin, MD
Clinical Director, Geriatric Lymphoma Outpatient Unit
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Professor of Medicine
New York, NY

Consulting Fees: Gilead, Genentech, Pfizer, Seattle Genetics
Contracted Research: Spectrum, Pfizer, Seattle Genetics, GSK
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.

  Danielle Shafer, MD (CME/CE PEER REVIEWER)


I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

Fairooz F. Kabbinavar, MD
Medical Director
UCLA Kidney Cancer Program
Associate Professor of Medicine
Division of Hematology and Oncology
Director, Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Program
UCLA
Los Angeles, CA

I have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report.

   
 

 

Peer Review Process of Conflicts of Interest

This educational activity has been independently peer-reviewed.
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Disclosure of Unlabeled Uses

This educational activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For additional information about approved uses, including approved indications, contraindications, and warnings, please refer to the prescribing information for each product or consult the Physicians' Desk Reference.

The Biomedical Learning Institute (BMLI) does not recommend the use of any agent outside of the FDA labeled indications. The opinions expressed in the educational activity are those of the faculty and do not necessarily represent the views of the BMLI. Please refer to the official FDA prescribing information for each product for discussion of approved indicated, contraindications, and warnings.

Acknowledgement of Supporters

Educational Grants

Sincere appreciation is extended to the following companies for their generous support of this educational aactivity: